42 Seconds with a Code42 Customer: Lehigh University

Code42 provides your business with a variety of data security benefits, including increased productivity, risk mitigation, streamlined user workflows, and more–all in a single product that’s been proven to ultimately save you money. While Code42 has a few primary use cases–backup and recovery, device migration, etc.–we’ve learned that our different customers use Code42 in different ways. To explore how customers use our product, we recently partnered with the talented team at creative agency Crash+Sues to create a series of animated videos featuring the voices and likenesses of actual Code42 users.

In our latest video, Naazer Ashraf, senior computing consultant at Lehigh University, explains why they rely on Code42 over sync and share products for data backup and restore. As one of the nation’s premier research universities, Lehigh’s faculty are known for their excellence in research. Obviously, data is extremely important (and valuable) to researchers, so imagine the reaction when one researcher deleted files from Google Drive to save space–and discovered that doing so wiped the files for 10 other researchers. Naazer tells the story in just 42 seconds. Check it out below.

Forrester Offers Five Best Practices for Ransomware Protection

Ransomware has reared its ugly head again, this time bearing the name Bad Rabbit. According to analysts at Crowdstrike, Bad Rabbit shares 67 percent of the same code as NotPetya, meaning this variant may actually be the work of the same threat actor. Bad Rabbit marks the third major ransomware outbreak in 2017. With WannaCry, NotPetya, and now Bad Rabbit, the public is more aware of ransomware than ever. However, awareness is not enough to protect your organization, your employees, and your files. With every outbreak, we come to realize that prevention is never foolproof, and faster detection only gets you so far. What matters most is the speed in which you can respond and bounce back when disruptions like ransomware strike. Forrester has assembled a guide in the proper response to ransomware in the report “Ransomware Protection: Five Best Practices.” Key takeaways of the report include:

  • Avoiding a ransom payment is possible
  • Preventing ransomware doesn’t require new security investments
  • Focus on your core security needs

In addition, consider these important tips that will also help you amp up your speed of response to ransomware attacks:

The human element of ransomware doesn’t get enough attention.

Laptops and desktops are hit by ransomware most often for a simple reason: they’re operated by users. Your employees are moving fast to create the ideas that make the business run, meaning they are prime targets for threat actors. Plus, cybercriminals are getting more and more sophisticated. They’ve optimized ransomware’s “user experience” to increase the odds that a victim falls prey and inevitably pays up.

Don’t blame humans for being human.

Don’t just give them the tools and training to know the dangers, but also the tools to always bounce back when they’ve made an error. Humans will make mistakes. It’s the role of IT and security teams to minimize the disruption and impact of those mistakes, get the idea engine – your employees – back up and running, so the business keeps moving forward.

Protection requires a renewed focus on IT and security basics.

It’s these basics that Forrester analysts Chris Sherman and Salvatore Schiano discuss in detail in the Forrester report. Read “Ransomware Protection: Five Best Practices” today to learn how to minimize business disruption when ransomware strikes.

Protect Your Data from Insider Threats with Code42

Code42 provides your business with a variety of benefits, including increased productivity, risk mitigation, streamlined user workflows, and more – all in a single product that’s been proven to ultimately save you money. Recently, Code42 launched Security Center, a new suite of tools to help you spot suspicious data use behaviors in your workforce – and respond to them if necessary. There’s a big reason why we added this feature – the facts show that 89 percent of corporate data loss involves the actions of an insider.

We recently partnered with the talented team at creative agency Crash+Sues to create a series of videos about the core features of Code42. This most recent video focuses on an all-too common scenario in which an employee decides to steal valuable data from his employer. Unfortunately for him, this company has Code42’s Security Center.

Take a look today for an illustration of how Code42 and Security Center can help keep your enterprise’s data safe from insider threats.

Gosh, Well, What Can We Say Except “Thank You?”

Wherever their data lives or moves, whether on endpoints or in the cloud, our customers trust us to protect their ideas, and we take that trust seriously. Ensuring their success is our number one mission here at Code42.

That’s why it is especially gratifying when we are recognized among industry innovators for finding new ways to make our customers’ data safer and workflows easier. We are thrilled to announce that in the first half of 2018 Code42 has received a number of industry honors:

  • Winner: Cyber Defense Magazine 2018 InfoSec Award
    Hot Company: Insider Threat Detection
  • Winner: Cyber Defense Magazine 2018 InfoSec Award
    Cutting Edge: Endpoint Security
  • Winner: 2018 SC Awards Europe
    Best Data Leakage Prevention Solution
  • Winner: Info Security PG’s Global Excellence Awards
    Security Products and Solutions for the Enterprise, Gold
  • Winner: Info Security PG’s Global Excellence Awards
    Endpoint Security, Silver
  • Winner: 2018 Fortress Cyber Security Awards
    Threat Detection
  • Finalist: 2018 SC Awards                                                          
    Best Data Leakage Prevention Solution

While we’re proud to make a difference in the lives of our customers, we also take pride in making Code42 a great place to work for employees. Code42 was recently named one of the Top Workplaces in Minnesota by the Star Tribune, our local newspaper. As a Top Workplace, Code42 joins the ranks of the most progressive companies in Minnesota, based on employee opinions measuring engagement, organizational health and satisfaction.

It’s the dedication and hard work of our employees that enable us to continue to fulfill our customer-first mission. With that said, we want to extend special thanks to our employees and customers whose passion for what they do has driven us for the last 17 years to become an industry leader in data security.

Finding Files in the Wild: From Months to Hours

Every day, your organization faces a variety of data security challenges. Many come from outside your organization, but a significant number also come from within. There are countless reasons why someone may take sensitive data from your organization, many of which are purely opportunistic. For example, what if a file with sensitive financial information is mistakenly emailed to an entire company? That may prove too tempting an opportunity for some. How can your organization respond when this happens? In this post, I’ll discuss how the response process often works today—and how it can be streamlined with Code42 Forensic File Search.

A true story

Here’s a true story of an IT team working through just such a challenge: At this organization, the HR team used Microsoft Excel for management of financial information such as bonus structures and payout schedules. By mistake, a member of the team sent an email containing an Excel file with compensation information for the entire staff to the whole company, instead of the select few who were supposed to receive it. Over 6,000 employees worldwide received the email.

Fortunately, the most sensitive information was contained on a hidden tab in the Excel file, and most employees never even opened the file. The IT team was able to recall the email, but the legal team needed to know who in the company had downloaded and opened it, in case the information within was ever used in a lawsuit. The IT and Security teams were tasked with finding every copy of the file in the organization.

A painful two-month process

While recalling the email cut the number of potential endpoints to search to around 1,000, the IT team still had to search all those devices—many of which belonged to individuals at the organization’s international offices. The IT team used a Windows file searching utility to crawl the user endpoints in question, searching for the name of the file. However, Outlook’s email client can scramble names of files, so the IT team also had to scan for any Excel file in the Temp folder of each machine, and open those files to visually confirm that it wasn’t the file in question.

Each scan would take between one and eight hours, depending on the size of the drive—and the scan could only be run when the target endpoint was online. If a laptop was closed during the scan, the process would have to be restarted. If a device was located in an international office, the IT team would have to work nights in order to run the scan during that office’s working hours.

The process was a tremendous hit to productivity. The IT team tasked fully half its staff to running the scans. Two of the organization’s five security team members were tasked with overseeing the process. Even the legal team’s productivity was affected. Since the IT team had to open every version of the file to verify the sensitive financial data within, the legal team had to draw up non-disclosure agreements for every person working on the project.

All told, the search for the mistakenly distributed financial file took the organization two months, and the IT team estimated that they had only recovered 80 percent of the instances of the file.

“ With Code42 Forensic File Search, administrators can search and investigate file activity and events across all endpoints in an organization in seconds. ”

A better way: Code42 Forensic File Search

Fortunately, there is a better method for locating critical files in an organization. With Code42 Forensic File Search, administrators can search and investigate file activity and events across all endpoints in an organization in seconds. In the case of this Excel file, the IT team could have used Code42 Forensic File Search to search for the MD5 hash of the file. By searching for the MD5 instead of the file name, Code42 Forensic File Search would locate all instances of the file across all endpoints, including versions that had been renamed in the Temp folder or renamed to intentionally disguise the file. This single search would find all copies of the file, even on endpoints that are offline.

The feature video demonstrates Code42 Forensic File Search in action. The IT team member that shared this story is confident that it would have played out very differently with Code42 Forensic File Search. “Had we had Code42 Forensic File Search deployed, that project was probably done in a couple hours,” he said. “We would have cut two months to a couple hours.”

Tips From the Trenches: Automating File Scans and Alerts

Welcome to the first post of our Tips from the Trenches blog series. Authored by the Code42 security team, the series will explore some of the industry’s latest data security tools and tricks.

One of the best parts of working on the Code42 security operations team is that we’re facing (and solving) many of the exact same challenges as our customers. That means we get to share our experiences and trade tools, tips and tactics for what works—and what doesn’t. With that in mind, here are a few of the cool new ways we’re using search to identify hidden threats before they turn into big problems.

Better criteria for automated scanning and alerting

We’ve got a couple of tools set up to constantly scan our digital environments for risks. Recently, I created a new tool in Python that helps us go deeper with that scanning and alerting—searching via MD5 hash, hostname and filename, to name a few. This scriptable interface to the Code42 Forensic File Search API also allows for use of the full API by accepting raw JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) search payloads, meaning searches are only limited by the imagination of the user.

“ The scriptable interface to the Code42 Forensic File Search API also allows for use of the full API by accepting raw JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) search payloads, meaning searches are only limited by the imagination of the user. ”

Identifying macro-enabled Office files—a common malware source

One sample JSON search payload is the repo searches for macro-enabled Office files in users’ Downloads directories, such as *.docm and *.xlsm files—some of the most common vectors for malware. With the new tool, an automatic search alerts us when new files arrive on endpoints, so we can take action—such as sending the MD5 hash to a service like Virus Total to get a report, or even retrieving the file and sending it to a malware analysis sandbox if necessary.

Snuffing out WannaCry threats

We’ve done some early integration work to test combining Code42 Forensic File Search with a threat intel feed. This will allow us to search and detect malicious files based on MD5 hashes sourced from paid or open-source intel services.

Sharing new threat search tools and tactics

Like you, we’re dealing with new and evolving threats on a daily basis here on the Code42 Security Operations team. We’re constantly looking for new ways to use the tools we have to search and detect threats in smarter, better ways. All of the new search tools I mentioned above are available on our public Github site: https://github.com/code42/ffs-tools.

Live Q&A

Have questions about using Code42 Forensic File Search? Senior Product Manager Matthias Wollnik and I will be fielding questions live on Tuesday, July 24 from 10:30-11:30 am US Central time in the Code42 community.

Keep an eye out for more Tips from the Trenches coming soon—until then, happy threat hunting!

Data, Humans and the Cloud, Part 3: Facing Reality

Digital transformation is changing the face of business. All business. As part of this shift, many IT leaders have decided to use their cloud collaboration tools for data protection and recovery—tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box and Dropbox. According to a 2017 Intel Security Study, 74 percent of businesses now store some sensitive information in the cloud. And according to a Code42 customer survey, 67 percent of companies have data in three or more cloud storage services.

While a cloud-focused future is clearly the goal, there is still a considerable amount of data being saved to the endpoint. In fact, Code42’s 2017 CTRL-Z Study revealed that IT decision makers believe that as much as 60 percent of corporate information lives on user laptops. Over the course of our three-part blog series, we explore the critical role human behavior plays in how data is stored and protected as your business moves to the cloud.

“ Exclusively using a cloud file sharing or collaboration tool for data protection and recovery leaves companies exposed to a variety of harmful business situations. ”

Part 3: The consequences of the digital transformation/human behavior disconnect

Tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box and Dropbox definitely have a role to play in a digital transformation strategy. They are great for sharing files, improving workflows, simplifying collaboration for team projects and enabling productivity. However, businesses need to be aware of the challenges posed by relying on them to safeguard and protect company data.

While employees might use these tools to share a specific file, Code42’s 2017 CTRL-Z study found that not every file makes it to an officially sanctioned cloud platform. For example, employees may have files on endpoints that they never intend to share with coworkers; or they may create multiple versions of a file before they are ready to share or collaborate. The final version gets uploaded to the company cloud, but the previous five versions that only exist on the user’s endpoint may be no less valuable to the business. This is why exclusively using a cloud file sharing or collaboration tool for data protection and recovery leaves companies exposed to a variety of harmful business situations, including:

  • Data loss, when an employee deletes a shared file that collaborators can no longer access.
  • Theft, when data moves from laptop to thumb drive to personal cloud storage.
  • Breach, when malware or ransomware infects one laptop and propagates across a cloud system.
  • Non-compliance, should they lose track of where all regulated information resides.
  • Lost productivity, when collecting and preserving files for legal becomes manual.

Unpredictably human

As I mentioned in the first part of this series, employees are, at the end of the day, human. Humans tend to work in ways that make them feel the most productive and satisfied. You will always have employees who ignore policies that slow them down; this is true from your C-level executives all the way down to your most junior employees. And as I covered in the second part of this series, you’ll never have one policy that works for all of your employees, because there are four distinct types of users today when it comes to data storage.

“ Employees don’t create, share and store their work the way companies expect. Asking them to back up their files to cloud platforms is just as unrealistic as asking them to back up to file servers. ”

In short, organizations need to recognize and accept that employees don’t create, share and store their work the way companies expect. Asking them to back up their files to cloud platforms is just as unrealistic as asking them to back up to file servers.

So, what can be done to overcome this gap between human behavior and your digital transformation? First, your organization needs to accept a few statements as true:

  • The files your employees create and store have value to the business.
  • The majority of employee files today still live on endpoints, despite what your policies may state.
  • Failing to protect every file from loss creates risks to productivity, security and compliance.

To ensure the best protection for your data, your security solution should not require intervention from users. If the solution requires action from employees to protect their files, you’ll wind up with critical data that’s unprotected. Your solution must cover all files on all endpoints and back up at regular intervals, so if a data loss incident does occur, the endpoint can be rolled back to a restore point before the event happened. The solution should offer separate archives for every user, so your organization’s data can’t be accessed if one user’s account is somehow breached. Finally, your solution should offer visibility into how the files in your organization move, whether they travel to removable media or to the cloud storage you’re using for collaboration. With data-level visibility, you can be sure every critical file in your organization is completely protected.

According to 451 Research, “60 percent of enterprises plan to shift IT off-premises by 2019, driven by digital transformation.” An important and sometimes overlooked consideration in making this shift is studying the workforce and how employees get work done. After all, employees are the ones creating the very ideas that are driving success in your organization. Are you using the right tools to make sure those ideas are being protected?

Data, Humans and the Cloud, Part 2: Four Types of Users

Digital transformation is changing the face of business. All business. As part of this shift, many IT leaders have decided to use their cloud collaboration tools for data protection and recovery—tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box and Dropbox. According to a 2017 Intel Security Study, 74 percent of businesses now store some sensitive information in the cloud. And according to a Code42 customer survey, 67 percent of companies have data in three or more cloud storage services.

While a cloud-focused future is clearly the goal, there is still a considerable amount of data being saved to the endpoint. In fact, Code42’s 2017 CTRL-Z Study revealed that IT decision makers believe that as much as 60 percent of corporate information lives on user laptops. Over the course of our three-part blog series, we explore the critical role human behavior plays in how data is stored and protected as your business moves to the cloud.

Read Part 1: Unexpected Behavior here.

“ By understanding the user types that make up a workforce and their work patterns, companies can set out on a digital transformation course that avoids unintentionally creating information risk inside their business. ”

Part 2: The four types of users in your organization and how they store data

From Part 1 of this blog series, the data is clear that most employees don’t work the way IT leaders expect, nor the way their policies may dictate. To add further clarity to this point, a recent Code42 study broke down work habits by common user types. We call them Adopters, Collaborators, Innovators and Travelers. There is a natural alignment between some roles, as illustrated below:

  • Adopters are typically found in finance, human resources or legal roles.
  • Collaborators are often found in marketing, IT and support roles.
  • Innovators are commonly found in research and development, and engineering roles.
  • Travelers are usually found in sales and executive roles.

While there are certainly many differences in the work habits of, for example, your marketing team and engineering team, for the purposes of this study we only examined how they store data in cloud storage services.

  • Adopters keep more than 75 percent of their files in cloud storage services.
  • Collaborators keep 50-75 percent of their files in cloud storage services.
  • Innovators keep 25-49 percent of their files in cloud storage services.
  • Travelers keep less than 25 percent of their files in cloud storage services.
Four types of users in your organization


You may think (or hope) that most of your employees are Adopters, but our research shows that they only make up 10 percent of users. Collaborators are a bit more common—they make up 20 percent of your users. Innovators are the most common, making up 40 percent of users. That leaves Travelers at 30 percent of users. In total, 70 percent of users have less than 50 percent of their data in your cloud storage services.

The power of knowledge

Your initial reaction to this data may be negative. After all, it’s natural to feel discouraged when you learn that employees aren’t following your data protection policies. The silver lining: By understanding the user types that make up a workforce and their work patterns, companies can set out on a digital transformation course that avoids unintentionally creating information risk inside their business.

In the final post in this series, I’ll discuss the consequences of the disconnect between digital transformation and human behavior—and what your organization can do about it.

3D Printing: From Employee Hobby to Life-Changing Tech

At Code42, our employees firmly believe that technology can be used to make the world a better place. As an organization, we’re also big promoters of employees volunteering for organizations they believe in. Sometimes, the two beliefs come together seamlessly. Here’s an example of one philanthropic project that involves using technology for the greater good: making 3D-printed prosthetic hands.

Code42 Software Engineers Joseph Bozarth and Tom Florin have been working with e-NABLE, a nonprofit that allows volunteers to create hands and arms “for those who were born missing fingers or who have lost them due to war, disease or natural disaster.” The Washington state-based organization is entirely operated by volunteers who create free 3D-printed hands and arms for people around the world in need of an upper limb assistive device. While many of the prosthetics are suitable for and strong enough for plumbers and electricians, many of the individuals the organization works with are children, who will need prosthetics of several different sizes as they grow.

The Code42 volunteers

Joseph and Tom have both been with Code42 since 2016. Tom said one of the big attractions to working here is the company’s “strong unselfish desire to see us succeed in building things.” Joseph agreed. “Being afforded the opportunity to take time off to give back to the community to make a difference is rarer than it should be,” he said. Both say they’ve never worked anywhere before that supported volunteering.

Around Code42, both Tom and Joseph are well-known for their shared “addiction” to 3D printing. “A while back, Tom came to me and asked if I would be interested in getting involved with an organization that involves 3D-printing for those in need,” said Joseph. e-NABLE provided a perfect outlet.

“ Getting the chance to work on projects that give back to the community is rewarding. I’d be doing this project even if I didn’t work at Code42, but it is nice to know that my company is supportive and encouraging of my efforts. ”

How it’s helping today

“Traditional prosthetics can be extremely expensive,” said Joseph. “Most people, I don’t think, realize just how expensive a prosthetic can be and to significantly lower that barrier for people is great.” A traditional basic hook-style prosthetic can easily cost $400 to $600. Joseph stressed that the costs can stack up considerably for children, who will need multiple prosthetics as they grow.

In comparison, printed hands cost under $20, and they can easily be enlarged as kids grow. Tom added that while they’re helping make prosthetics more affordable, they also are helping children express themselves. “I have seen volunteers even theme the prosthetics after superheroes like Captain America or Iron Man.”

Bringing it all home

Volunteering helps others, of course, but it also benefits those who do the volunteering. Tom said that this work has helped him learn more about 3D printing in general and how this young field is full of untapped potential. “I think that having the opportunity to work on projects like this is special because it shows Code42 is aware of the needs of others.”

“Having creative outlets, in general, is important to stay engaged at any job,” added Joseph. “Getting the chance to work on projects that give back to the community is rewarding. I’d be doing this project even if I didn’t work at Code42, but it is nice to know that my company is supportive and encouraging of my efforts.”

Code42 supports the efforts of volunteers like Tom and Joseph with our Volunteer Time Off (VTO) program. Since 2016, we’ve been promoting volunteerism via Code42 Cares, giving every employee two paid days off per year to volunteer for causes they’re passionate about.

For more information about e-NABLE, including how to become an approved creator for the organization, visit enablingthefuture.org.

Data, Humans and the Cloud, Part 1: Unexpected Behavior

Digital transformation is changing the face of business. All business. As part of this shift, many IT leaders have decided to use their cloud collaboration tools for data protection and recovery—tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box and Dropbox. According to a 2017 Intel Security Study, 74 percent of businesses now store some sensitive information in the cloud. And according to a Code42 customer survey, 67 percent of companies have data in three or more cloud storage services.

While a cloud-focused future is clearly the goal, there is still a considerable amount of data being saved to the endpoint. In fact, Code42’s 2017 CTRL-Z Study revealed that IT decision makers believe that as much as 60 percent of corporate information lives on user laptops. Over the course of our three-part blog series, we explore the critical role human behavior plays in how data is stored and protected as your business moves to the cloud.

“ Understanding how your employees actually create, store and share information is a critical first step in smoothing the path to any digital transformation. ”

Part 1: The disconnect between digital transformation and human behavior

Where do your employees store the files they create? Your policy may be for employees to put them on an approved shared drive, but that doesn’t actually answer the question. Policy is one thing, but what your employees actually do is something else entirely.

It’s clear there are benefits to deploying cloud collaboration products. Tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box and Dropbox can improve employee collaboration and productivity, enhance customer experiences and accelerate companies’ digital transformation strategies. It makes sense that many companies have mandated their use in today’s knowledge economy, in which ideas drive business growth. But just because you have a rule doesn’t mean it will be followed. Understanding how your employees actually create, store and share information is a critical first step in smoothing the path to any digital transformation.

Unexpected employee work habits  

To gain deeper insight into workforce habits, Code42 partnered with customers with between 500 and 5000 employees to examine data storage behavior. This study surveyed 1,039 users, 1,192 endpoint devices, 120 million files and 105 TB of data. The results quickly painted a clear picture: employees are not working the way that business leaders believe they are.

The study found that only 23 percent of the data employees generate and store on laptops and desktops makes its way to tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box or Dropbox. That means 77 percent of data lives exclusively on employee computers. When measured by file count, a mere one percent of all the files created are stored on cloud collaboration platforms. It goes without saying that if 99 percent of all files created are not being stored in the cloud, then the goals of digital transformation are not being realized.

Why does this disconnect exist? Employees are, at the end of the day, human. And its simply human nature to prefer to work using methods that feel the most productive and satisfying. We all have an emotional connection to the work we produce, as there is a natural tendency to feel that what we create has a piece of ourselves in it. With that in mind, it’s not surprising that employees tend to ignore policies that hinder their productivity or otherwise prevent them from producing their best work. This is true from entry-level workers all the way up to the C-suite. In fact, Code42’s CTRL-Z Study revealed that 75 percent of CEOs admit to using applications/programs that they aren’t sure are approved by IT—all in the name of productivity.

“ Code42’s CTRL-Z Study revealed that 75 percent of CEOs admit to using applications/programs that they aren’t sure are approved by IT—all in the name of productivity. ”

IT’s view on endpoint data is wrong

There is an opinion held by many IT leaders that nothing of value lives on employee laptops. Our study shows, however, that this isn’t the case at all. In addition to demonstrating the quantity of files on employee endpoints, the study also looked at employee-created files by file type. The study found that 36 percent of the files on employee laptops and desktops are indicative of intellectual property (IP), such as programming files, images, spreadsheets, zip files, presentations, and audio and video files. Failure to properly safeguard IP can leave a business open to significant risk. For example:

  • Losing source code or product roadmaps can impact time to market;
  • Losing strategy documentation can affect time to opportunity;
  • Losing customer lists or project proposals jeopardizes time to revenue; and
  • Losing customer information puts companies at a high risk of non-compliance.

Not only does data exist in large quantities on endpoints, that data has huge value. IP can account for 80 percent of a company’s business. If your IP lives on endpoints—not in the cloud—then IT needs a new approach to protecting that data.

The big picture

How can you bridge the divide between human behavior and your digital transformation into the cloud? Crafting policies around data backup that require employee action is, in a word, pointless. Employees didn’t back up in the era of file servers, and they won’t today with corporate-mandated cloud collaboration platforms. To safeguard their success, businesses on the path to a cloud-only digital transformation must accept and operationalize the fact that:

  • The files employees create and store have value to the business.
  • The majority of employee files today still live on endpoints, such as laptops and desktops.
  • Failing to protect every file from loss creates risks to productivity, security and compliance.

To deal with the divide between human behavior and your digital transformation, comprehensive data protection that doesn’t rely on user intervention is required. When all endpoint data is securely and automatically protected, you can be sure that all of the valuable data on employee laptops is being preserved. This is especially important given that four types of users in your organization all store data differently.

In my next blog post, I’ll dive deeper into these four user types, which will shed more light on the reality of how data is being stored in your organization.

Code42 Restores Files, Moods and Attitudes

Here’s a story you’ll probably recognize: Because there’s no sense reinventing the wheel, you use an existing file—for instance, an Excel file or PowerPoint presentation—as the starting point for a new project. As you transform that old file into something brilliant and new, you instinctively hit CTRL+S (because you don’t want to lose that work!)—and unintentionally overwrite the original file, destroying your previous (yet still valuable) work.

You may have also lived this story: You’re working diligently when an email or a webpage opens a pop-up. Thanks to clever trickery, the “OK” and “Cancel” buttons are renamed or the question is misleading, and you’re duped into the wrong click. Suddenly, you feel the heat from your computer as ransomware begins encrypting all your files.

Another painfully familiar tale: Your computer dies or is lost. A day later, your trusty IT team hands you a beautiful new one. This new computer is clean, pristine, fast and slick—but has none of your information on it.

The stages of data loss grief

I’ll bet everyone has experienced at least one of these disasters, so you also know the feelings of disbelief, rage, guilt and sadness that go with them. It’s a big deal! Your ideas are lost. Your data is gone. Your future productivity is marginalized as you scrounge around to find bits and pieces of your files and work.

“ We understand the value of your data; we understand the risk it constantly faces; and we understand the raw emotion of losing (and recovering) that value. ”

I know these feelings all too well. In fact, just last month, I ended up wiping out a presentation two days before I was due to take the stage as a keynote speaker. But it took me less than a minute to recover the file, because, not surprisingly, we here at Code42 have our agent deployed on every endpoint. This was just the latest, deeply personal reminder of why we do the work we do at Code42—why we work so tirelessly to protect your (and my) data. We understand the value of your data; we understand the risk it constantly faces; and we understand the raw emotion of losing (and recovering) that value.

Four big improvements make Code42 restores better than ever

In the last year, we’ve been focusing on updating our technologies to make your restore process even better. Here are four ways we’re taking data restores to a whole new level:

  • Speed: We know that the speed of a restore is at the heart of our solution. When you lose a file, every minute counts. In the last year, we’ve invested time in optimizing our technologies for the new file sizes we expect in 2018. For some of our customers, this has resulted in a 10x improvement in performance.
  • Push Restores: We’ve made a lot of changes to our technology and message queueing to make the push restores work much better. Ironically, modern computing sometimes works against us; computers have gotten so good at understanding their workload that they optimize for the operations they perform the most frequently. Statistically, the Code42 infrastructure does a lot more backups than restores—but those restores (your restores) need to be as fast as possible. We’ve re-trained our servers and message queuing to make sure that your restores are always our top priority.
  • Security: When you store as much data as we do at Code42, making sure it’s safe is absolutely critical. I was thinking about this recently during an internal security exercise. All customer data protected with Code42 is protected with the strongest possible data encryption both in transit and at rest. We continue to find ways to make your precious files even more secure.
  • Bulk Restores: Finally, we’ve done a lot to make sure that even if you are doing massive restores, they are still fast and easy. Whether it’s users recovering an entire machine in minutes, or organizations doing widespread device-to-device migrations (in case of an OS Migration or hardware refresh), we’ve minimized the time and the pain.

No matter how you use Code42, we take pride in taking those “much ado” moments and turning them into “nothing.” We love hearing that “Oh my gosh, thank you so much,” that comes from customers when they recover all of their lost files, and we’re proud to provide the technology that lets you do this for your users.

At Code42, we restore files, moods and attitudes.

Welcome Aboard to our 2018 Interns!

Two offices. 1,678 applicants. 21 new summer interns.

Code42 recently welcomed a new class of summer interns, and we couldn’t be more excited to have them join us for the summer. The 21 young people who make up the 2018 summer intern class are unique, brilliant and valued members of our team.

At Code42, our internship program is built around three guiding principles: To provide interns with real-world professional experiences; to build meaningful connections that last a lifetime; and to receive real-time feedback, evaluation and mentoring.

“I have been looking forward to this internship since I received the offer in December,” said product design intern Stephanie Zapuchlak. “I came in with high expectations and somehow Code42 and my wonderful team have blown those expectations out of the water. Not only am I working on real-life projects that I can add to my portfolio, but I also have acquired a second family in my team.

“I also was fortunate enough to help with the User Experience Professionals Association event, where I networked with other UX professionals from around Minnesota. I beamed with pride as my team spoke passionately about product design while on the panel. 10/10 internship!”

“ I came in with high expectations and somehow Code42 and my wonderful team have blown those expectations out of the water. ”

Over the course of their 13 weeks with us, our interns will be totally immersed in our culture and get a chance to live out our Code42 values. Our interns will also participate in a “#code42coffeeconnections” social media challenge, attend a night of baseball with their managers and mentors, and use their Volunteer Time Off (VTO) days to give back to the community and leave the world a better place.

During their time at Code42, the interns will also have the opportunity to join our executive team during weekly “Lunch and Learn” sessions, giving them a unique opportunity to learn from our senior leaders in a small group setting. Additionally, interns are involved in their team’s day-to-day projects, helping achieve team goals and metrics. This type of responsibility and real-world experience is truly where the program’s value can be found and what will make their experiences unforgettable. We are proud to play a critical part in helping these talented students build the lifelong skills they need for a successful career.

“ While I received a solid foundation at school, I was craving a challenge and exposure to real-world problems and applications. I got exactly what I hoped for! ”

“Prior to my internship with Code42, my experience was limited to my computer science courses,” said development intern Jack Hysell. “While I received a solid foundation at school, I was craving a challenge and exposure to real-world problems and applications. I got exactly what I hoped for! In just the few short weeks that I have been here, I have worked with internal APIs, implemented JUnit tests, and delved into Spring Boot applications. Perhaps the greatest part of this experience has been my team interactions. I’m not treated like an intern. My mentor and colleagues assign real problems, and encourage me to provide input. While it can be terrifying at first, full immersion is truly the best approach. I am definitely a different developer than I was three weeks ago, and I can’t wait to see where I am at the end of this experience!”

Congratulations interns, welcome to the team!

Cryptominers: The New Top Threat to Your Endpoints

Ransomware has been dominating headlines recently. In 2017, ransomware broke into the popular conscious, thanks to high-profile attacks like WannaCry and NotPetya. However, ransomware is no longer the top cybersecurity threat. According to the Comodo Cybersecurity Threat Research Labs’ Q1 Global Malware Report, ransomware has been replaced as the top cyber threat by cryptomining software, with 10 percent of malware incidents in the first three months of 2018 related to cryptomining.

There’s no “one size fits all” solution to deal with cryptominers. However, with data-level visibility into all file activity on your endpoint devices, you can locate and remediate cryptominer infections.

A paralyzing threat that’s hard to see

Cryptominers hijack resources from the owner of a device for the attacker’s profit. On a single machine, cryptominers may cause a performance drain, but it can be subtle enough to go unnoticed by a user. However, cryptominers don’t typically infect just one machine; attackers more commonly deploy botnets of infected systems working in tandem to make their money off of your equipment–and potentially your customers. One system vulnerability is invariably linked to many others, which means your whole network could potentially be exposed to further exploits and other cybercriminals.

In addition to exposing your customers to risk, a widespread cryptominer infection can cause an enterprise-wide resource drain that can also have real effects on productivity. Cryptomining also comes with huge energy costs. A big spike in your electricity bill is one of the surest signs of illicit cryptomining in your enterprise. 

Locating cryptominers can be tricky. Some variants are scripts embedded in websites that can be addressed with ad-blocking software. Others (which tend to target large enterprises) aren’t as easy to deal with. More sophisticated miners are often hidden within image files on compromised web servers. When users visit a compromised site or click an email link, the cryptomining tools attempt to plant the malicious image files on their machines.

Rooting out cryptomining software

If you have a data visibility tool that can search across your organization’s endpoints for specific files and file metadata, you can locate malware in your organization. In the case of cryptominers, using a forensic file search tool to search for javascripts associated with known cryptomining tools can tell you where those scripts exist. Once located, the infected endpoints can simply be deleted. In the case of more serious infections, the machine can be reverted back to a point before infection with your endpoint backup solution. 

Cryptomining software is one of the more challenging malware categories to deal with because there are so many varieties in existence. And, because the impact on an individual machine may be minimal, it is tempting to just ignore the problem. But, according to Malware Bytes, “unmanaged cryptocurrency miners could seriously disrupt business or infrastructure-critical processes by overloading systems to the point where they become unresponsive and shut down.” With comprehensive visibility into the data and metadata in your organization, you can more quickly identify and respond to cryptominers when you first suspect infection.

Accelerating Incident Response with Forensic File Search

A streamlined incident response process depends on collaboration between security and IT teams. However, in many organizations, these teams often work in silos, with separate technologies, priorities and resources. With Code42 Forensic File Search, security and IT teams can come together with a unified incident response process.

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