Architecting-IAM-for-AWS-with-Okta-Code42_Blog

Tips From the Trenches: Architecting IAM for AWS with Okta

In the last year, Code42 made the decision to more fully embrace a cloud-based strategy for our operations. We found that working with a cloud services provider opens up a world of possibilities that we could leverage to grow and enhance our product offerings. This is the story of how we implemented identity and access management (IAM) in our Amazon Web Services (AWS) environment.

IAM guiding principles

Once the decision was made to move forward with AWS, our developers were hungry to start testing the newly available services. Before they could start, we needed two things: an AWS account and a mechanism for them to log in. Standing up an account was easy. Implementing an IAM solution that met all of our security needs was more challenging. We were given the directive to architect and implement a solution that met the requirements of our developers, operations team and security team.

We started by agreeing on three guiding principles as we thought through our options:

1.) Production cloud access/administration credentials need to be separate from day-to-day user credentials. This was a requirement from our security team that aligns with existing production access patterns. Leveraging a separate user account (including two-factor authentication) for production access decreases the likelihood of the account being phished or hijacked. This secondary user account wouldn’t be used to access websites, email or for any other day-to-day activity. This wouldn’t make credential harvesting impossible, but it would reduce the likelihood of an attacker easily gaining production access by targeting a user. The attacker would need to adopt advanced compromise and recon methods, which would provide our security analysts extra time to detect the attack.

2.) There will be no local AWS users besides the enforced root user, who will have two-factor authentication; all users will come through Okta. Local AWS users have some significant limitations and become unwieldy as a company grows beyond a few small accounts. We were expecting to have dozens, if not hundreds, of unique accounts.  This could lead to our developers having a unique user in each of the AWS environments. These user accounts would each have their own password and two-factor authentication. In addition to a poor end-user experience, identity lifecycle management would become a daunting and manual task. Imagine logging into more than 100 AWS environments to check if a departing team member has an account. Even if we automated the process, it would still be a major headache.

Our other option was to provide developers with one local AWS user with permissions to assume role in the different accounts. This would be difficult to manage in its own way as we tried to map which users could connect to which accounts and with which permissions. Instead of being a lifecycle challenge for the IAM team, it would become a permissioning and access challenge.

Fortunately for us, Code42 has fully embraced Okta as our cloud identity broker. Employees are comfortable using the Okta portal and all users are required to enroll in two-factor authentication. We leverage Active Directory (AD) as a source of truth for Okta, which helps simplify user and permission management. By connecting Okta to each of our AWS accounts, users can leverage the same AD credentials across all AWS accounts — and we don’t need to make any changes to the existing IAM lifecycle process. Permissioning is still a challenge, but it can be managed centrally with our existing IAM systems. I will describe in greater detail exactly how we achieved this later in the post.

3.) Developers will have the flexibility to create their own service roles, but will be required to apply a “deny” policy, which limits access to key resources (CloudTrail, IAM, security, etc.).  As we were creating these principles, it became clear that the IAM team would not have the bandwidth to be the gatekeepers of all roles and policies (how access is granted in AWS). Developers would need to be empowered to create their own service roles, while we maintained control over the user access roles via Okta. Letting go of this oversight was very difficult. If not properly managed, it could have opened us up to the risk of malicious, over-permissioned or accidental modification of key security services.

Our initial solution to this problem was to create a “deny” policy that would prevent services and users from interacting with some key security services. For example, there should never be a need within an application or microservice to create a new IAM user or a new SAML provider. We notified all users that this deny policy must be attached to all roles created and we used an external system to report any roles that didn’t have this deny policy attached.

Recently, AWS released a new IAM feature called permission boundaries. The intent of permission boundaries is similar to that of our deny policy.  By using permission boundaries we can control the maximum permissions users can grant to the IAM roles that they create.  We are planning to roll this out in lieu of the deny policy in the very near future.

Example of a role found without the deny policy attached

Implementing Okta and AWS

When thinking through connecting Okta and AWS, we were presented with two very different architectural designs: hub and spoke and direct connect. The hub and spokedesign leverages an AWS landing account that is connected to Okta. Once logged in to this account, users can switch roles into other AWS accounts that are authorized. The direct connect design we implemented creates a new Okta application icon for each AWS account. Users access their accounts by visiting their Okta homepage and selecting the account they want to use.

Power users tend to prefer the hub and spoke model, as this allows them to quickly jump from account to account without re-logging in or grabbing a new API token. The more casual users prefer to have all accounts presented on one page. They aren’t swapping among accounts, and it isn’t fair to ask them to memorize account numbers (or even exact short names) so they can execute an assume role command. In addition to user experience, we considered how easy it was to automate management once a new account has been created. The two approaches each have merit, so we decided to implement both.

When a new account is created, it is bootstrapped to leverage the hub and spoke landing account. Automation can immediately start working with the account, and certain power users get the access they need without any IAM intervention. The IAM team can revisit the account when convenient and stand up the direct connection to Okta. New Okta features, currently in beta, will improve this direct connect process.

One final thing I would like to touch on is how we leverage the Okta launcher to get API tokens in AWS. One of the benefits of having local users in AWS is that each user is given their own API key. While this is a benefit to end users, these keys are very rarely rotated and could present a significant security risk (such as an accidental public GitHub upload). To address this, Okta has created a java applet that generates a temporary AWS API key. The repo can be found here. Like many other companies, we have created wrappers for this script to make things as easy as possible for our end users. After cloning the repo, a user can type the command “okta -e $ENV_NAME” and the script will reach out to Okta and generate an API key for that specific AWS account.  The users do need to know the exact environment name for this script to work, but most power users that need API access will have this information.

No matter where your company is on the path to leveraging a cloud service provider, IAM is a foundational component that needs to be in place for a successful and secure journey. If possible, try to leverage your existing technologies to help improve user experience and adoption. I hope the principles we shared here help you think through your own requirements.

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