Code42 Next-Gen Data Loss Protection: What DLP Was Meant to Be

Malware and other external cyber threats get most of the headlines today. It’s not surprising, given the damage done to companies, industries and even countries by outside-in attacks on data. Despite that, insider threats — the risks of data being lost or stolen due to actions inside the company — are just as big a threat.

According to the 2018 Insider Threat Report by Cybersecurity Insiders, 90 percent of cybersecurity professionals feel vulnerable to insider threat. McKinsey’s Insider threat: The human element of cyberrisk reports that 50 percent of breaches involved insiders between 2012-2017.

“ By rethinking traditional DLP, you can know exactly where all your data is, how it is moving throughout your organization and when and how it leaves your organization — without complex policy management, lengthy deployments or blocks to your users’ productivity. ”

“The rise of insider threats is a significant threat to every business and one that is often overlooked,” said Jadee Hanson, Code42’s CISO. “While we all would like to think that employees’ intentions are good, we prepare for malicious actions taken by those from within our organizations. As external protection increases, we all should be concerned as to the influence external actors may have on those working for us and with us every day.”

Insider threats are a big deal, and traditional data loss prevention (DLP) solutions were developed to protect companies and their data from these internal events.

DLP hasn’t delivered

While traditional DLP solutions sound good in concept, most companies are only using a fraction of their capabilities. Security teams describe using these solutions as “painful.” Legacy DLP deployments take months or years, because proper setup requires an extensive data classification process, and refining DLP policies to fit unique users is complex and iterative. And after all that time, traditional DLP still blocks employees from getting their work done with rigid data restrictions that interfere with user productivity and collaboration. They also require on-site servers — counter to the growing business priority of moving solutions to the cloud.

Most importantly, legacy DLP solutions are focused on prevention. Business and security leaders now recognize that prevention alone is no longer enough. Mistakes happen, and data threats sometimes succeed. Being able to recover quickly from data loss incidents is just as important as trying to prevent them.

Rethink DLP

At Code42, we protect over 50,000 companies from internal threats to their data. This focus on protection has enabled us to see things differently, and develop an alternative to data loss prevention: data loss protection. We are excited to announce the new Code42 Next-Gen Data Loss Protection (Code42 Next-Gen DLP) solution that rethinks legacy DLP and protects data from loss without slowing down the business.

Code42 Next-Gen DLP is cloud-native and protects your cloud data as well as all of your endpoint data. It deploys in days instead of months, and provides a single, centralized view with five key capabilities:

  • Collection: Automatically collects and stores every version of every file across all endpoints, and indexes all file activity across endpoints and cloud. 
  • Monitoring: Helps identify file exfiltration, providing visibility into files being moved by users to external hard drives, or shared via cloud services, including Microsoft OneDrive and Google Drive.
  • Investigation: Helps quickly triage and prioritize data threats by searching file activity across all endpoints and cloud services in seconds, even when endpoints are offline; and rapidly retrieves actual files — one file, multiple files or all files on a device — to determine the sensitivity of data at risk.
  • Preservation: Allows configuration to retain files for any number of employees, for as long as the files are needed to satisfy data retention requirements related to compliance or litigation.
  • Recovery: Enables rapid retrieval of one file, multiple files or all files on a device even when the device is offline, or in the event files are deleted, corrupted or ransomed.

By rethinking traditional DLP, you can know exactly where all your data is, how it is moving throughout your organization and when and how it leaves your organization — without complex policy management, lengthy deployments or blocks to your users’ productivity. DLP can finally deliver on what it was originally created to do.

Data, Humans and the Cloud, Part 3: Facing Reality

Digital transformation is changing the face of business. All business. As part of this shift, many IT leaders have decided to use their cloud collaboration tools for data protection and recovery—tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box and Dropbox. According to a 2017 Intel Security Study, 74 percent of businesses now store some sensitive information in the cloud. And according to a Code42 customer survey, 67 percent of companies have data in three or more cloud storage services.

While a cloud-focused future is clearly the goal, there is still a considerable amount of data being saved to the endpoint. In fact, Code42’s 2017 CTRL-Z Study revealed that IT decision makers believe that as much as 60 percent of corporate information lives on user laptops. Over the course of our three-part blog series, we explore the critical role human behavior plays in how data is stored and protected as your business moves to the cloud.

“ Exclusively using a cloud file sharing or collaboration tool for data protection and recovery leaves companies exposed to a variety of harmful business situations. ”

Part 3: The consequences of the digital transformation/human behavior disconnect

Tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box and Dropbox definitely have a role to play in a digital transformation strategy. They are great for sharing files, improving workflows, simplifying collaboration for team projects and enabling productivity. However, businesses need to be aware of the challenges posed by relying on them to safeguard and protect company data.

While employees might use these tools to share a specific file, Code42’s 2017 CTRL-Z study found that not every file makes it to an officially sanctioned cloud platform. For example, employees may have files on endpoints that they never intend to share with coworkers; or they may create multiple versions of a file before they are ready to share or collaborate. The final version gets uploaded to the company cloud, but the previous five versions that only exist on the user’s endpoint may be no less valuable to the business. This is why exclusively using a cloud file sharing or collaboration tool for data protection and recovery leaves companies exposed to a variety of harmful business situations, including:

  • Data loss, when an employee deletes a shared file that collaborators can no longer access.
  • Theft, when data moves from laptop to thumb drive to personal cloud storage.
  • Breach, when malware or ransomware infects one laptop and propagates across a cloud system.
  • Non-compliance, should they lose track of where all regulated information resides.
  • Lost productivity, when collecting and preserving files for legal becomes manual.

Unpredictably human

As I mentioned in the first part of this series, employees are, at the end of the day, human. Humans tend to work in ways that make them feel the most productive and satisfied. You will always have employees who ignore policies that slow them down; this is true from your C-level executives all the way down to your most junior employees. And as I covered in the second part of this series, you’ll never have one policy that works for all of your employees, because there are four distinct types of users today when it comes to data storage.

“ Employees don’t create, share and store their work the way companies expect. Asking them to back up their files to cloud platforms is just as unrealistic as asking them to back up to file servers. ”

In short, organizations need to recognize and accept that employees don’t create, share and store their work the way companies expect. Asking them to back up their files to cloud platforms is just as unrealistic as asking them to back up to file servers.

So, what can be done to overcome this gap between human behavior and your digital transformation? First, your organization needs to accept a few statements as true:

  • The files your employees create and store have value to the business.
  • The majority of employee files today still live on endpoints, despite what your policies may state.
  • Failing to protect every file from loss creates risks to productivity, security and compliance.

To ensure the best protection for your data, your security solution should not require intervention from users. If the solution requires action from employees to protect their files, you’ll wind up with critical data that’s unprotected. Your solution must cover all files on all endpoints and back up at regular intervals, so if a data loss incident does occur, the endpoint can be rolled back to a restore point before the event happened. The solution should offer separate archives for every user, so your organization’s data can’t be accessed if one user’s account is somehow breached. Finally, your solution should offer visibility into how the files in your organization move, whether they travel to removable media or to the cloud storage you’re using for collaboration. With data-level visibility, you can be sure every critical file in your organization is completely protected.

According to 451 Research, “60 percent of enterprises plan to shift IT off-premises by 2019, driven by digital transformation.” An important and sometimes overlooked consideration in making this shift is studying the workforce and how employees get work done. After all, employees are the ones creating the very ideas that are driving success in your organization. Are you using the right tools to make sure those ideas are being protected?

Data, Humans and the Cloud, Part 2: Four Types of Users

Digital transformation is changing the face of business. All business. As part of this shift, many IT leaders have decided to use their cloud collaboration tools for data protection and recovery—tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box and Dropbox. According to a 2017 Intel Security Study, 74 percent of businesses now store some sensitive information in the cloud. And according to a Code42 customer survey, 67 percent of companies have data in three or more cloud storage services.

While a cloud-focused future is clearly the goal, there is still a considerable amount of data being saved to the endpoint. In fact, Code42’s 2017 CTRL-Z Study revealed that IT decision makers believe that as much as 60 percent of corporate information lives on user laptops. Over the course of our three-part blog series, we explore the critical role human behavior plays in how data is stored and protected as your business moves to the cloud.

Read Part 1: Unexpected Behavior here.

“ By understanding the user types that make up a workforce and their work patterns, companies can set out on a digital transformation course that avoids unintentionally creating information risk inside their business. ”

Part 2: The four types of users in your organization and how they store data

From Part 1 of this blog series, the data is clear that most employees don’t work the way IT leaders expect, nor the way their policies may dictate. To add further clarity to this point, a recent Code42 study broke down work habits by common user types. We call them Adopters, Collaborators, Innovators and Travelers. There is a natural alignment between some roles, as illustrated below:

  • Adopters are typically found in finance, human resources or legal roles.
  • Collaborators are often found in marketing, IT and support roles.
  • Innovators are commonly found in research and development, and engineering roles.
  • Travelers are usually found in sales and executive roles.

While there are certainly many differences in the work habits of, for example, your marketing team and engineering team, for the purposes of this study we only examined how they store data in cloud storage services.

  • Adopters keep more than 75 percent of their files in cloud storage services.
  • Collaborators keep 50-75 percent of their files in cloud storage services.
  • Innovators keep 25-49 percent of their files in cloud storage services.
  • Travelers keep less than 25 percent of their files in cloud storage services.
Four types of users in your organization


You may think (or hope) that most of your employees are Adopters, but our research shows that they only make up 10 percent of users. Collaborators are a bit more common—they make up 20 percent of your users. Innovators are the most common, making up 40 percent of users. That leaves Travelers at 30 percent of users. In total, 70 percent of users have less than 50 percent of their data in your cloud storage services.

The power of knowledge

Your initial reaction to this data may be negative. After all, it’s natural to feel discouraged when you learn that employees aren’t following your data protection policies. The silver lining: By understanding the user types that make up a workforce and their work patterns, companies can set out on a digital transformation course that avoids unintentionally creating information risk inside their business.

In the final post in this series, I’ll discuss the consequences of the disconnect between digital transformation and human behavior—and what your organization can do about it.

Data, Humans and the Cloud, Part 1: Unexpected Behavior

Digital transformation is changing the face of business. All business. As part of this shift, many IT leaders have decided to use their cloud collaboration tools for data protection and recovery—tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box and Dropbox. According to a 2017 Intel Security Study, 74 percent of businesses now store some sensitive information in the cloud. And according to a Code42 customer survey, 67 percent of companies have data in three or more cloud storage services.

While a cloud-focused future is clearly the goal, there is still a considerable amount of data being saved to the endpoint. In fact, Code42’s 2017 CTRL-Z Study revealed that IT decision makers believe that as much as 60 percent of corporate information lives on user laptops. Over the course of our three-part blog series, we explore the critical role human behavior plays in how data is stored and protected as your business moves to the cloud.

“ Understanding how your employees actually create, store and share information is a critical first step in smoothing the path to any digital transformation. ”

Part 1: The disconnect between digital transformation and human behavior

Where do your employees store the files they create? Your policy may be for employees to put them on an approved shared drive, but that doesn’t actually answer the question. Policy is one thing, but what your employees actually do is something else entirely.

It’s clear there are benefits to deploying cloud collaboration products. Tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box and Dropbox can improve employee collaboration and productivity, enhance customer experiences and accelerate companies’ digital transformation strategies. It makes sense that many companies have mandated their use in today’s knowledge economy, in which ideas drive business growth. But just because you have a rule doesn’t mean it will be followed. Understanding how your employees actually create, store and share information is a critical first step in smoothing the path to any digital transformation.

Unexpected employee work habits  

To gain deeper insight into workforce habits, Code42 partnered with customers with between 500 and 5000 employees to examine data storage behavior. This study surveyed 1,039 users, 1,192 endpoint devices, 120 million files and 105 TB of data. The results quickly painted a clear picture: employees are not working the way that business leaders believe they are.

The study found that only 23 percent of the data employees generate and store on laptops and desktops makes its way to tools like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box or Dropbox. That means 77 percent of data lives exclusively on employee computers. When measured by file count, a mere one percent of all the files created are stored on cloud collaboration platforms. It goes without saying that if 99 percent of all files created are not being stored in the cloud, then the goals of digital transformation are not being realized.

Why does this disconnect exist? Employees are, at the end of the day, human. And its simply human nature to prefer to work using methods that feel the most productive and satisfying. We all have an emotional connection to the work we produce, as there is a natural tendency to feel that what we create has a piece of ourselves in it. With that in mind, it’s not surprising that employees tend to ignore policies that hinder their productivity or otherwise prevent them from producing their best work. This is true from entry-level workers all the way up to the C-suite. In fact, Code42’s CTRL-Z Study revealed that 75 percent of CEOs admit to using applications/programs that they aren’t sure are approved by IT—all in the name of productivity.

“ Code42’s CTRL-Z Study revealed that 75 percent of CEOs admit to using applications/programs that they aren’t sure are approved by IT—all in the name of productivity. ”

IT’s view on endpoint data is wrong

There is an opinion held by many IT leaders that nothing of value lives on employee laptops. Our study shows, however, that this isn’t the case at all. In addition to demonstrating the quantity of files on employee endpoints, the study also looked at employee-created files by file type. The study found that 36 percent of the files on employee laptops and desktops are indicative of intellectual property (IP), such as programming files, images, spreadsheets, zip files, presentations, and audio and video files. Failure to properly safeguard IP can leave a business open to significant risk. For example:

  • Losing source code or product roadmaps can impact time to market;
  • Losing strategy documentation can affect time to opportunity;
  • Losing customer lists or project proposals jeopardizes time to revenue; and
  • Losing customer information puts companies at a high risk of non-compliance.

Not only does data exist in large quantities on endpoints, that data has huge value. IP can account for 80 percent of a company’s business. If your IP lives on endpoints—not in the cloud—then IT needs a new approach to protecting that data.

The big picture

How can you bridge the divide between human behavior and your digital transformation into the cloud? Crafting policies around data backup that require employee action is, in a word, pointless. Employees didn’t back up in the era of file servers, and they won’t today with corporate-mandated cloud collaboration platforms. To safeguard their success, businesses on the path to a cloud-only digital transformation must accept and operationalize the fact that:

  • The files employees create and store have value to the business.
  • The majority of employee files today still live on endpoints, such as laptops and desktops.
  • Failing to protect every file from loss creates risks to productivity, security and compliance.

To deal with the divide between human behavior and your digital transformation, comprehensive data protection that doesn’t rely on user intervention is required. When all endpoint data is securely and automatically protected, you can be sure that all of the valuable data on employee laptops is being preserved. This is especially important given that four types of users in your organization all store data differently.

In my next blog post, I’ll dive deeper into these four user types, which will shed more light on the reality of how data is being stored in your organization.

Five Steps to Disarming Ransomware Attacks

You have 48 hours to send two Bitcoins to the address below or your data will be erased. Do not contact the authorities.

If you’ve seen this notice, you know the fear induced by a ransomware attack. And if you haven’t, there’s a good chance you soon will. In 2017, the number of ransomware assaults grew 250 percent in the first quarter alone, causing millions of dollars in lost productivity and lost data. Today, ransomware remains one of the top cyber threats to enterprises. Why? Here are 10 factors that make ransomware irresistible to cybercriminals—and five steps to disarming attacks.

  1. Ransomware tools are becoming more sophisticated: From malware that flies under the AV radar to brute force attacks, hackers are constantly getting better at getting in. Better encryption makes it all but impossible for victims to unlock their files without paying for the key.
  2. Phishing, sadly, still works: Phishing attacks have been going on for 30 years now, so users must be experts at spotting them by now, right? Wrong. Phishing attacks are still effective, and employees may assume that IT and security teams are keeping them safe from phishing attacks.
  3. The most vulnerable attack vector is unprotected: Without a comprehensive endpoint backup solution, an organization’s laptops and desktops are unprotected. And yet, the Code42 CTRL-Z study revealed that IT decision makers believe that 60 percent of corporate information lives on users’ laptops. If executives know this, so do cybercriminals.
  4. Human behavior creates risk: Your policies say that employees must back up their data to a shared server to keep it safe from endpoint attacks. Unfortunately, employees aren’t following your protocol, leaving endpoint data—which is more than half of enterprise data—unprotected.
  5. Anyone can launch a ransomware attack: Following the trend of the legitimate software industry, Ransomware-as-a-Service (RaaS) takes ransomware accessibility to a new level. People with little technical expertise can “rent” ransomware and create their own phishing emails.
  6. Cryptocurrency makes money laundering easy: To a cybercriminal, the risky part of ransomware is direct interaction with a victim to obtain payment. But the emergence of cryptocurrencies removes much of this risk, creating a digital layer of anonymity between the victim and extortionist.
  7. Attacks target the enterprise: Cybercriminals are increasingly targeting those most likely to pay, and businesses are the ideal targets. They have valuable data they can’t afford to lose and a lot more cash on hand than individual targets.
  8. Once in an organization, ransomware spreads quickly: It only takes one employee to spread an infected file throughout your organization. Your employees are sharing thousands of files with each other every day. Cloud collaboration platforms make file sharing easier than ever, but platforms with automatic sync can actually spread ransomware, syncing infected files to the shared cloud and exposing others.
  9. Prevention is nearly impossible: The number of cybercriminals, combined with the sprawling attack surface, make prevention virtually impossible. More importantly, preventive AV products can’t stop human error. Bigger walls and stronger locks do nothing if your employees are willingly or unintentionally handing over the keys.
  10. Paying the ransom fuels the demand: As long as victims keep paying the ransom, money will continue to pour into the growing black market for ransomware and fuel the increasing sophistication of these exploits. More money, more hackers, more attacks and higher ransoms­­–these are the real costs of paying the ransom.

Break the cycle: focus on the data

The 10 items above paint a bleak picture, but the antidote to ransomware is actually quite simple: Shift the focus from those trying to steal data to the data they’re trying to steal. By focusing on ensuring all data is collected and protected, the enterprise can enable a swift, clean recovery from ransomware and fight it at its source. Here are five quick tips to disarm ransomware:

  1. Collect and protect the data: Truly comprehensive enterprise data protection includes covering data where it lives—on the endpoint. The solution can’t rely on user behavior, and it can’t slow down user productivity because employees will work around it. The solution must be automatic, continuous and frictionless to give IT certainty that every user, every device, every file and every version is covered.
  2. If ransomware hits, have no fear: With all laptop and desktop data continuously backed up, ransomware ceases to be scary. The enterprise has the tools in place to execute an efficient, successful recovery.
  3. Make the clean, quick restore: Comprehensive endpoint data protection turns restore from a costly, weeks-long affair into a quick, push-button task. IT simply rolls back to the last known good state to conduct bulk file restores or allows users to perform a self-service restore.
  4. Never pay the ransom: With quick and comprehensive data restores, the enterprise can laugh at ransom demands.
  5. Feel proudyou’re doing your part: With the tools in place to take the ransom out of ransomware, the enterprise community can cut off the cash flow and begin to shut down the ransomware market.

Every Idea Matters: Secure Them with Code42

At the most basic level, every business sprang from an idea. Every advancement, every cure, every game changer–they all started as a concept in someone’s mind. No matter the industry, ideas are the fuel that helps every one of our customers grow.

Every idea matters. It’s a simple concept, but one that guides us at Code42 as we secure our customers’ data–their ideas–wherever they live or move.

Case in point: This week we announced the Code42 Forensic File Search product, which helps security, IT and compliance teams dramatically reduce the time it takes to investigate, respond to and recover from data security incidents that threaten their valuable IP. Because it collects file metadata and events across all endpoints in an organization and makes them searchable via the cloud, you can cut incident response investigations from weeks and months to mere seconds.

Expanding security capabilities

While this new product is exciting in itself, it also marks an important expansion of our security capabilities for global enterprises. With Code42 Backup + Restore, you have access to complete file contents on any endpoint. Code42’s File Exfiltration Detection gives you visibility into departing employees moving files to external drives or cloud services. Code42 Forensic File Search provides you metadata from file activity. Together, these features offer you the greatest visibility yet into what’s happening to the valuable ideas on your organization’s endpoints.

Later this year, we’ll extend the same visibility to the data that lives on corporate cloud applications, including Microsoft OneDrive, Google Drive, Box and Slack. While the endpoint will continue to be relevant, and a key source of data exfiltration and infiltration, we know that in the next five years that much of the data on endpoints will move to the cloud. We intend to be at the forefront of this transition.

Every feature of the Code42 platform was designed with the same end goal in mind: to protect the valuable ideas fueling our customers’ growth. Our customers are changing the world with their ideas. It’s our job to keep those ideas safe. Because every idea matters.

The Forrester Playbook for Insider Threat

Insider threat definitely isn’t slowing down in 2018—because it’s a human problem, and most companies aren’t getting rid of humans anytime soon. Forrester just released a playbook that gives data security leaders a starting point for improving their insider threat programs in 2018. The report lays out a clear path for moving toward smart, context-aware risk detection—without slowing users down.

Most insider threat strategies are still flawed

According to the Cybersecurity Insiders 2018 Insider Threat Report, most organizations surveyed (73 percent) say they have controls in place to detect and respond to insider threats. Unfortunately, traditional DLP is the tool most commonly used. As we’ve explained before, this is a faulty approach, as data loss prevention (DLP) software forces “all or nothing” policies and can leave valuable IP unprotected. Moreover, while 90 percent say monitoring and profiling data activity and data access is important, most companies only monitor some of the data, some of the time. And while analytics and AI are transforming other parts of digital business, only one in three companies are using analytics to monitor user data activity and movement.

Three questions every data security leader should ask

As you read the report, think about your organization’s own insider threat program and ask yourself the following questions:

  • Can you protect all your data—structured and unstructured, on servers, in the cloud and on user endpoints?
  • Can you see when and where that data moves, so you can pinpoint risky activity early?
  • Does your insider threat detection solution give you smart alerts you can trust and use (i.e., not overwhelming you with false positives)?

If you can’t confidently answer “YES” to all three of these questions, then you absolutely need to read the new Forrester report.

Forrester Offers Five Best Practices for Ransomware Protection

Ransomware has reared its ugly head again, this time bearing the name Bad Rabbit. According to analysts at Crowdstrike, Bad Rabbit shares 67 percent of the same code as NotPetya, meaning this variant may actually be the work of the same threat actor. Bad Rabbit marks the third major ransomware outbreak in 2017. With WannaCry, NotPetya, and now Bad Rabbit, the public is more aware of ransomware than ever. However, awareness is not enough to protect your organization, your employees, and your files. With every outbreak, we come to realize that prevention is never foolproof, and faster detection only gets you so far. What matters most is the speed in which you can respond and bounce back when disruptions like ransomware strike. Forrester has assembled a guide in the proper response to ransomware in the report “Ransomware Protection: Five Best Practices.” Key takeaways of the report include:

  • Avoiding a ransom payment is possible
  • Preventing ransomware doesn’t require new security investments
  • Focus on your core security needs

In addition, consider these important tips that will also help you amp up your speed of response to ransomware attacks:

The human element of ransomware doesn’t get enough attention.

Laptops and desktops are hit by ransomware most often for a simple reason: they’re operated by users. Your employees are moving fast to create the ideas that make the business run, meaning they are prime targets for threat actors. Plus, cybercriminals are getting more and more sophisticated. They’ve optimized ransomware’s “user experience” to increase the odds that a victim falls prey and inevitably pays up.

Don’t blame humans for being human.

Don’t just give them the tools and training to know the dangers, but also the tools to always bounce back when they’ve made an error. Humans will make mistakes. It’s the role of IT and security teams to minimize the disruption and impact of those mistakes, get the idea engine – your employees – back up and running, so the business keeps moving forward.

Protection requires a renewed focus on IT and security basics.

It’s these basics that Forrester analysts Chris Sherman and Salvatore Schiano discuss in detail in the Forrester report. Read “Ransomware Protection: Five Best Practices” today to learn how to minimize business disruption when ransomware strikes.

5 Reasons Why Endpoint Resiliency Matters More Than Ever

Endpoint resilience is an end user’s ability to bounce back, carry on, never stop, to adapt and respond quickly to changes and daily disruptions, both intentional and unintentional. While most organizations have a business technology resilience plan, sometimes referred to as business continuity, it is often centered around servers and storage in the data center. With a workforce that’s more virtual and mobile than ever, focusing exclusively on data center resilience can leave an organization vulnerable, bringing the engine that drives growth to a screeching halt. That engine is the workforce, and it is fueled by the very ideas they create and store every minute of every day on their laptops.

Let’s face it, stuff is going to happen. The unpredictability of hardware, users, and the threat landscape in which we work all lead to disruption. An endpoint resiliency strategy is nothing more than minimizing the impact of said disruptions so that the business, IT, and Security teams can keep moving forward. The business wants to move forward by boosting the productivity of its workforce fostering an environment of creativity, ideation, and innovation. IT wants greater agility so they can minimize daily disruptions and focus on the bigger picture. And, security teams want greater insight so when bad stuff does happen, they can quickly investigate and respond to minimize the impact.

Here are 5 reasons why endpoint resiliency matters more than ever:

  1. Half of your company’s value lives on endpoints – According to Deloitte, intellectual property (IP) can make up 80 percent of a company’s value – and research shows that 60 percent of your company data is created and stored on endpoints. That means potentially half of a company’s value lives on employee laptops and desktops.
  2. Ideas (IP) fuel growth and two-thirds of executives agree: losing it destroys growth – Growth is the top priority of 60 percent of CEOs, and growth is fueled by ideas. From contracts and customer lists to research and roadmaps, ideas created and stored by employees on endpoints are often at the heart of a business’ growth strategy. To quote Meg Whitman, CEO of Hewlett Packard Enterprise, “in an Idea Economy, success is defined by the ability to turn ideas into value faster than your competition.” Most of those “ideas” start on your user’s laptops.
  3. Organizations’ most vulnerable ideas are on endpoints – From cyberattacks and user errors to mergers, acquisitions, and litigation, the loss of ideas or IP created and stored on endpoints are growing every day. Industry research says that as much as 70 percent of data loss incidents originate on the endpoint.
  4. Protecting all endpoint data – every version or every file – boosts IT agility. By having a complete backup of all end user data, IT can cut tech refresh times from 3 hours per device to 30 minutes. They can completely take themselves out of the legal hold process by never having to take possession of an end user’s device. Heck, they can even foster self-service IT with tools that make end user file restore and migration simple. All of which adds up to more time for the IT team.
  5. Having all end user files gives Security teams actionable intelligence – If there is one thing security teams want more than anything these days, it’s actionable intelligence. With so much noise being generated by security products, it is becoming increasingly difficult to tell what is material risk versus what isn’t. By having all end user data, security teams have a treasure trove of insights on user activity and the lifecycle files and their movement on and off the corporate network. Greater insight means faster detection and investigation resulting in faster time to respond when the really bad stuff hits.

In the research report “Business Technology Resiliency Matters More Than Ever,” Forrester says, “Threats and challenges to business technology services range from simple misconfiguration to widespread natural disasters to targeted cyberattacks. In today’s environment, businesses need the ability to bounce back not just from catastrophes but all kinds of disruptions, both expected and unexpected.”

This is especially true for end user laptops and desktops. As you read the Forrester report, think about your organization’s endpoint resiliency strategy. Are you keeping the very ideas that are created and stored on your end users’ devices safe? Is your current backup solution dependable? The Forrester report will guide you through the key elements of building a modern business technology resiliency plan. Read it today to ensure that your growth engine keeps running. 

Forrester Examines the Total Economic Impact™ of Code42: Webinar Available On-Demand

The buyer mindset has shifted from a drive to protect the business at all costs to a drive to grow the business. But the focus on growth shifts what’s expected of IT teams—and dramatically changes how businesses define the value of the technologies and tools they’re investing in.

Leaders expect a business case for IT investment

Analysts are looking closely at how IT teams are feeling the impacts of the focus on growth. Forrester says 90 percent of IT decision-makers now agree there’s value in making a strong business case for an IT investment. But unlike the business cases of the recession years, today’s IT business case must go beyond cost savings and risk mitigation. It needs to show how an IT investment moves the business forward—supporting things like productivity, innovation, scalability, agility and ultimately, growth.

Forrester shows Code42 supports smart business growth

At Code42, we’ve always been focused on delivering real business value to our customers. We recently commissioned Forrester to conduct a Total Economic Impact™ (TEI) study on Code42 customers—quantifying the benefits, costs, risks, and the value of the flexibility gained from Code42’s essential IP protection. The results speak for themselves. The table below is an excerpt from the TEI study and shows the three-year impact for a typical Code42 customer.

3-Year TEI Impact for Typical Code42 Customer

Full TEI webinar and study available on-demand

All the juicy details of the Forrester TEI study are revealed in our 30-minute webinar, featuring guest speaker Dean Davison, Forrester principal consultant and author of the study. The webinar covers the hard numbers on how Code42 supports business growth, including:

  • Increased productivity
  • Minimized downtime and business disruptions
  • Streamlined user workflows
  • Mitigating risks that can impede growth strategies
  • Plus: First-person accounts on how Code42 has helped IT teams support business growth initiatives

You can also read the full report, The Total Economic Impact™ Of Code42: Cost Savings And Business Benefits Enabled By Endpoint Backup.

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