Code42 blog

Code42 is Committed to Diversity and Inclusion

What makes a company a great place to work? In our diverse world, having engaged and empowered employees requires more than just good pay and benefits. At Code42, we believe that employee satisfaction is enhanced when we go beyond just business goals, truly listen to who people are and make concrete efforts to include them. This is why we launched Belong at Code42, a team dedicated to creating a culture of inclusivity within the company.

Belong at Code42

Belong at Code42 is a group of 14 people from across all departments, skill levels, backgrounds and identities. The team comes together regularly to help the company fulfill three key goals for our employees: ensuring everyone is a resource, everyone has a place, and everyone thrives at Code42.

“We’re focused on the current state of diversity and inclusion in the company, how we hope to see things change, and what we can do to affect that change,” said Derek Sung, Code42 committee member and senior designer. “Our goal is to help employees feel like they can be their authentic self at work. It feels good to be a part of this, because it doesn’t feel like it’s just an HR exercise.”

“Previous companies I’ve worked at didn’t have much interest in inclusion,” said Code42 committee member and senior talent acquisition business partner, Heidi Daumen. “But focusing on diversity and inclusion is such a big part of building a culture. As a group, we work hard to develop goals that are actionable and measurable. It’s very hard to get 14 people in a room and not have it turn into strictly philosophical conversations. But we are doing it.”

Putting focus on inclusion

In its first six months, Belong at Code42 has taken concrete steps to make the company more inclusive for everyone, including hosting outside speakers and panel discussions, and delivering training for Code42 employees on a variety of diversity and inclusion topics. The employee handbook has been rewritten with more inclusive language to make employees of all backgrounds feel welcome. Code42 has signed both the Minnesota Technology Diversity Pledge and the National Tech Inclusion Pledge.

These positive steps have been noticed by the Code42 workforce as a whole. “People are really happy that this is happening,” said Daumen. “This is an environment that is very open to what we’re doing. Making sure that everyone feels comfortable and welcome when they come to work is only going to make the company better for all.”

One outward sign of success: Code42 was recently named one of Minnesota’s Top 150 Workplaces for 2018 by the Star Tribune. Of course, we don’t work to achieve an inclusive culture simply to win awards. We firmly believe that creating and maintaining an environment that supports authenticity and celebrates what makes us different ultimately benefits our customers. We have a big job here at Code42. The customers we support, the ideas we protect and the trust we maintain with our customers is the backbone of our company. When employees are happy and comfortable at work, they can better focus on meeting the needs of our customers. We all do our best work when we’re in a place where we feel like we truly belong.

For information about careers at Code42, visit code42.com/careers.

3D Printing: From Employee Hobby to Life-Changing Tech

At Code42, our employees firmly believe that technology can be used to make the world a better place. As an organization, we’re also big promoters of employees volunteering for organizations they believe in. Sometimes, the two beliefs come together seamlessly. Here’s an example of one philanthropic project that involves using technology for the greater good: making 3D-printed prosthetic hands.

Code42 Software Engineers Joseph Bozarth and Tom Florin have been working with e-NABLE, a nonprofit that allows volunteers to create hands and arms “for those who were born missing fingers or who have lost them due to war, disease or natural disaster.” The Washington state-based organization is entirely operated by volunteers who create free 3D-printed hands and arms for people around the world in need of an upper limb assistive device. While many of the prosthetics are suitable for and strong enough for plumbers and electricians, many of the individuals the organization works with are children, who will need prosthetics of several different sizes as they grow.

The Code42 volunteers

Joseph and Tom have both been with Code42 since 2016. Tom said one of the big attractions to working here is the company’s “strong unselfish desire to see us succeed in building things.” Joseph agreed. “Being afforded the opportunity to take time off to give back to the community to make a difference is rarer than it should be,” he said. Both say they’ve never worked anywhere before that supported volunteering.

Around Code42, both Tom and Joseph are well-known for their shared “addiction” to 3D printing. “A while back, Tom came to me and asked if I would be interested in getting involved with an organization that involves 3D-printing for those in need,” said Joseph. e-NABLE provided a perfect outlet.

“ Getting the chance to work on projects that give back to the community is rewarding. I’d be doing this project even if I didn’t work at Code42, but it is nice to know that my company is supportive and encouraging of my efforts. ”

How it’s helping today

“Traditional prosthetics can be extremely expensive,” said Joseph. “Most people, I don’t think, realize just how expensive a prosthetic can be and to significantly lower that barrier for people is great.” A traditional basic hook-style prosthetic can easily cost $400 to $600. Joseph stressed that the costs can stack up considerably for children, who will need multiple prosthetics as they grow.

In comparison, printed hands cost under $20, and they can easily be enlarged as kids grow. Tom added that while they’re helping make prosthetics more affordable, they also are helping children express themselves. “I have seen volunteers even theme the prosthetics after superheroes like Captain America or Iron Man.”

Bringing it all home

Volunteering helps others, of course, but it also benefits those who do the volunteering. Tom said that this work has helped him learn more about 3D printing in general and how this young field is full of untapped potential. “I think that having the opportunity to work on projects like this is special because it shows Code42 is aware of the needs of others.”

“Having creative outlets, in general, is important to stay engaged at any job,” added Joseph. “Getting the chance to work on projects that give back to the community is rewarding. I’d be doing this project even if I didn’t work at Code42, but it is nice to know that my company is supportive and encouraging of my efforts.”

Code42 supports the efforts of volunteers like Tom and Joseph with our Volunteer Time Off (VTO) program. Since 2016, we’ve been promoting volunteerism via Code42 Cares, giving every employee two paid days off per year to volunteer for causes they’re passionate about.

For more information about e-NABLE, including how to become an approved creator for the organization, visit enablingthefuture.org.

Welcome Aboard to our 2018 Interns!

Two offices. 1,678 applicants. 21 new summer interns.

Code42 recently welcomed a new class of summer interns, and we couldn’t be more excited to have them join us for the summer. The 21 young people who make up the 2018 summer intern class are unique, brilliant and valued members of our team.

At Code42, our internship program is built around three guiding principles: To provide interns with real-world professional experiences; to build meaningful connections that last a lifetime; and to receive real-time feedback, evaluation and mentoring.

“I have been looking forward to this internship since I received the offer in December,” said product design intern Stephanie Zapuchlak. “I came in with high expectations and somehow Code42 and my wonderful team have blown those expectations out of the water. Not only am I working on real-life projects that I can add to my portfolio, but I also have acquired a second family in my team.

“I also was fortunate enough to help with the User Experience Professionals Association event, where I networked with other UX professionals from around Minnesota. I beamed with pride as my team spoke passionately about product design while on the panel. 10/10 internship!”

“ I came in with high expectations and somehow Code42 and my wonderful team have blown those expectations out of the water. ”

Over the course of their 13 weeks with us, our interns will be totally immersed in our culture and get a chance to live out our Code42 values. Our interns will also participate in a “#code42coffeeconnections” social media challenge, attend a night of baseball with their managers and mentors, and use their Volunteer Time Off (VTO) days to give back to the community and leave the world a better place.

During their time at Code42, the interns will also have the opportunity to join our executive team during weekly “Lunch and Learn” sessions, giving them a unique opportunity to learn from our senior leaders in a small group setting. Additionally, interns are involved in their team’s day-to-day projects, helping achieve team goals and metrics. This type of responsibility and real-world experience is truly where the program’s value can be found and what will make their experiences unforgettable. We are proud to play a critical part in helping these talented students build the lifelong skills they need for a successful career.

“ While I received a solid foundation at school, I was craving a challenge and exposure to real-world problems and applications. I got exactly what I hoped for! ”

“Prior to my internship with Code42, my experience was limited to my computer science courses,” said development intern Jack Hysell. “While I received a solid foundation at school, I was craving a challenge and exposure to real-world problems and applications. I got exactly what I hoped for! In just the few short weeks that I have been here, I have worked with internal APIs, implemented JUnit tests, and delved into Spring Boot applications. Perhaps the greatest part of this experience has been my team interactions. I’m not treated like an intern. My mentor and colleagues assign real problems, and encourage me to provide input. While it can be terrifying at first, full immersion is truly the best approach. I am definitely a different developer than I was three weeks ago, and I can’t wait to see where I am at the end of this experience!”

Congratulations interns, welcome to the team!

Code42 STEM

On Coder Day, Code42 Invests in its Families and a More Technical Future

At Code42, one of the ways we invest in our employees is to invest in their families – which is why Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day is a highlight of our year. In Code42-style, we call it “Bring Your Coder to Work Day.” Employees bring their kids to the office for a first-hand look at what Mom or Dad does at work – and to take part in some fun science and tech activities while they are at it.

This year, on April 26th, we opened our doors at our Minneapolis headquarters to welcome 200 kids – more than ever. They became “Junior Guardians” for the day (a theme based off of the Guardians of the Galaxy movies), learned about our core values, joined sing-a-longs and paraded through the office in costumes they created. Older children learned to code with binary numbers and built their first websites. There was even a chance to learn about mindfulness and give yoga a try.

Coder Day is a blast, but it’s a lot more than just a good time. Coder Day gives the next generation an opportunity to experience creating technology, not just using it. Exposing our children to STEM topics helps them learn more about the world and sets them up for success in a more technical future.

Coder Day is made possible by the amazing volunteers who dedicated their day to teaching our youth and making the experience a unique and memorable one for each and every child. We are already planning for next year and can’t wait to do it all again!

Here are some of the websites created by our kids:

If you would like to learn more about how you can introduce your child to STEM education, please visit the NEA’s STEM resources page.

Six Months a Guardian

Last week marked my six-month anniversary at Code42, and I couldn’t be prouder of our teams – what we’re focused on doing, our vision for where we’re going and what I know we’re going to do in the future. We are pouring blood, sweat and tears into creating a safer future for our customers’ ideas, a protected world for our users and a world of growth for those bold organizations that embrace innovation, forging a new future in their respective industries.

To our administrators: If you think about the change that we’ve endured in the past five years, it’s shocking. We’ve been asked to embrace mobility, cloud, virtualization, containerization, the server-less world, Infrastructure as a Service, Software as a Service, identity, federated authentication and compliance. It’s seemingly been an endless sea of changes, and the plight we’ve all faced is only compounded by the reality of data darkness we live in. However, Code42 is here to help.

To our users: Our teams here truly believe your ideas are beautiful and important. We wake up daily determined to figure out new ways to protect them. We recognize how every individual contributes to the greater growth of their organization. We’re here to keep your ideas safe, allowing you to contribute at your absolute best.

To the security teams that rely on Code42 to defend your organizations from the endless darkness of the cybersecurity world we live in: Realize that if there was a magic switch on the wall to dispel the data darkness, we’d flip it to let in the light. We know you and your users are under constant assault from individuals who seek to steal, ransom and destroy the ideas that will grow your organization. We’ve made countless changes to increase our defenses of your data and to stay one step ahead of those who seek to destroy or hold captive your value. We’re a partner in this journey.

– Rob

P.S. – Last, but not least, to my fellow guardians: Thank you for an amazing first six months. You have done incredible work and I’m so proud of the work we’re doing to make the world a safer place.

Code42 security industry awards

Three Security Industry Award Wins, and Why It Matters

What a month it’s been for Code42!

Last week, we hosted Evolution18, our annual customer conference; we launched Code42 Forensic File Search, an innovative, game-changing product for the information security market; and in the past few days, we were honored with three security industry awards:

Each of these awards is a true honor. Together, they point to the innovation we are driving, and how that’s paying off for our customers. Here are three takeaways.

Innovation drives us

The three awards we won point to our commitment to innovation. It’s a priority for us. We drive innovation to help our customers succeed – safeguarding their ideas wherever they live or move, whether that be on endpoints or in the cloud.

The value of visibility

You can’t protect what you can’t see. Our focus on visibility – helping companies see where their data lives and moves – is striking a chord with our customers and the industry in general.

When our customers win, we do too

While receiving these industry awards is a great honor, what’s even more meaningful for us is being able to recognize our customers.  Just last week at Evolution, we honored a select group of customers with our Evolutionaries awards. These annual awards celebrate our customers for their extraordinary innovations in the development, deployment and adoption of applications in data recovery and visibility. We’ll profile these winners in another post; I think you’ll be impressed with what they have accomplished.

There’s an unmistakable link between the amazing results our Evolutionaries are delivering for their organizations, and our selection as winners of these industry awards. By helping them win their data security battles, their businesses win, and we do too.

Evolution18 Begins Today

We’re thrilled to say that Evolution18, our annual customer conference, kicks off today! We are looking forward to welcoming customers and partners from around the globe to San Francisco. During the next three days, attendees will hear the latest on all the most important topics in data security, connect with industry experts, learn from the pros in our 30+ breakout sessions, get certified on Code42 administration – and, we think, have some fun in the process!

Of course, we understand that not everyone can join us in California. That’s why we plan to post some of the biggest news from the event right here. This includes an exciting announcement about Code42’s newest product, which will take our data security capabilities to a new level, as well as the winners of our annual Evolutionaries Awards. We love to share success stories when we hear them. The awards honor Code42 customers that have demonstrated dedication to delivering the best possible data security and recovery solutions.

We’re also looking forward to sharing event highlights like the keynote speech from Theresa Payton, one of the nation’s leading experts in cybersecurity and IT strategy. Theresa served as the first female chief information officer at the White House, overseeing IT operations for President George W. Bush and his staff. Theresa has already shared some great thoughts on the state of cybersecurity with us, and we can’t wait to hear more.

Stay tuned to the blog all week for more on Evolution18.

Meet Evolution Guest Keynote Theresa Payton (part 2)

We are excited to welcome Theresa Payton, one of the nation’s leading experts in cybersecurity and first female White House CIO, as our guest keynote at Evolution18. Don’t miss the chance to meet her in person at our annual conference, April 9-11, in San Francisco. It’s not too late to register and attend!

Before she takes center stage, we asked Theresa to share her thoughts on the state of the security space and how it has evolved since her time as White House CIO. In part two of our interview, Theresa talks about the investigation process, the risks of the move to the cloud and securing the digital transformation.

Code42: Why do cybersecurity investigations take so long? What steps can security teams take today to shorten them?

Theresa Payton: In Hollywood movies, a geek sits at a computer in the dark, and starts typing away at a keyboard. The geek looks at lists of files and computer code and then, “aha,” finds the evidence that’s needed. If only it worked that way. There are no magic programs that allow investigators to do their work. It’s a literal “whodunit” when there is an incident. Cybersecurity investigations are complex. Often you do not have a witness to talk to that saw the cybercriminal deposit the malware or break into the company.  Cybercriminals may delete their tracks, making it hard to pinpoint what they actually stole and how.

One of the best things you can do is to have a plan in advance. Practice digital disasters and practice doing forensics. Set ground rules. Identify the tools you need to purchase and the training your team will need. Interview vendors and choose a vendor that you can work with if the forensics is too overwhelming to handle in house or if you want a second opinion.

C42: What are the risks facing companies as they embrace the move to the cloud?

TP: Think about the data that you and your customers are going to generate. Using cloud platforms can sometimes be a better option than managing your own servers.

You do need someone on your team worrying about the security configurations of your cloud instance. The cloud service providers do not do this for you. There remains no set-it-and-forget-it option when it comes to security.

C42: IT teams are tasked with moving the business forward by helping employees be more effective and embracing the mobile workforce. What advice do you have for security leaders embracing this digital transformation?

TP: No company is perfect. It’s not a technology issue. It’s a creativity issue and an issue of business risks. We have to really try to understand what risks we are willing to take, and which ones are non-negotiable business risks.

What you see in safer companies are the executives taking this very seriously. You often see a governance board, which could be different executives from around the company—so you may see C-suite members from marketing, customer service, legal, finance and risk.

Often, finance is assuming the role of getting that group together because finance is also thinking about the business strategy, business enablement and reducing business risk. Spending that time to talk upfront at the executive level about security as it relates to the organization’s most critical assets is vital to making sure that the issue actually permeates through the rest of the company.

A key item to remember about security is that in spite of following regulatory compliance checklists and compliance frameworks, bad things still happen. Following checklists didn’t stop WannaCry or Petya from spreading, HBO from getting hacked, or help Twitter, Netflix and Amazon during the scary hours of Friday, October 21, 2016, when we realized the Internet was slowing down and, in many cases, not available at all.

What was the cause of the slowdown of the Internet last year? Weaponized baby cams and other Internet of Things devices. It was on that fateful day that the Marai Botnet attack hit Dyn. Dyn, a cloud-based Internet performance management company was the target of a disruptive Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack. The attack directed networked devices to route traffic at the Dyn’s Domain Name Servers (DNS). As a result, Dyn could not respond to the flood of DNS requests and consumers could not reach web sites. It was the biggest, baddest DDoS attack ever… at least until the next time.

C42: Has Hollywood and the media done a good job of portraying cybersecurity and the threats we face? Any examples that have proven to be accurate/predictive?

TP: Our reality TV show, Hunted, did a good job portraying the challenges investigators face when chasing fugitives and the challenges the public faces based on how they live their digital lives. I believe Endemol Shine and CBS did a good job portraying how your digital tracks can betray you. The one thing you did not see were the hours and hours of our team digging and coming up with nothing. You just see the exciting parts. If you have not watched it, my mom says it’s her favorite show and you should trust my mom.

More about Theresa: A pioneering technology leader
Theresa Payton is one of the nation’s leading experts in cybersecurity and IT strategy. She is currently CEO of Fortalice Solutions, an industry-leading security consulting company; and co-founder of Dark Cubed, a cybersecurity product company.

Theresa began her career in financial services, and after executive roles at Bank of America and Wachovia, she served as the first female chief information officer at the White House, overseeing IT operations for President George W. Bush and his staff.

Up Close with Theresa Payton: Former White House CIO and Guest Keynote at Evolution (Part 1)

Meet Evolution Guest Keynote Theresa Payton (part 1)

We are excited to welcome Theresa Payton, one of the nation’s leading experts in cybersecurity and first female White House CIO, as our guest keynote at Evolution18. Don’t miss the chance to meet her in person at our annual conference, April 9-11, in San Francisco. It’s not too late to register and attend!

Before she takes center stage, we asked Theresa to share her thoughts on the state of the security space and how it has evolved since her time as White House CIO. In Part One of our interview, she talks about the evolution of security threats, social media data privacy and enterprise cybersecurity blind spots.

Code42: How have security threats evolved since your time in the White House? Are there any new threats that you didn’t anticipate?

Theresa Payton: Many of the challenges companies face today are similar to the security challenges at the White House. The pivotal moment for me that shifted how I design a security strategy started at the Executive Office of the President, in the White House. The security at the White House could not be just about boxes, servers, oppressive end-user policies and blinking lights in the Security Operations Center. Security at the White House came down to the people who served at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, across America and abroad. We knew we had to address the hearts and minds of the staff if we wanted to protect their privacy and security. After all, if solving cybersecurity and privacy issues was as simple as following security best practices, we would all be safe. It’s not that simple.

The cybercrime threats to organizations change every day and move all over the globe. The biggest change is the larger hit to an operation’s systems, especially in the cases where the victim has been hit by ransomware. That’s why companies need to make strategic investments to protect themselves.

The attacks that make the news typically have complex motivations that are both economic and political; but the vast majority of attacks, many unreported, are simply about the money.

As far as any threats that I didn’t anticipate, not so far; but I can say that regarding my predictions, I wish I were wrong.

C42: Based on your time in the government, do you see a law like GDPR ever being passed in the U.S.?

TP: It is possible we will see Congress one day pass a consumer bill of rights for the Internet, digital safety and privacy; but I think we are several years away from that.

Privacy laws, the court systems and law enforcement’s ability to source cases are lagging with the digital age. Technology, specifically drones, have been a great tool for law enforcement in spotting potential victims and helping rescue those who need help in dangerous conditions. But with the popularity of domestic drones, we now have flying spies in our neighborhoods. This is a discussion that as a society we need to have. It’s common knowledge that it’s not polite to peep through people’s windows—it’s illegal.

But do we have any laws protecting us from social media companies collecting and selling our data, credit bureaus from aggregating our spending habits and selling our information, and our neighbors’ surveillance cameras or overhead drones from gathering our data? We don’t—at least not yet.

C42: What are enterprises missing when they think about data security?

TP: It’s very challenging for companies to get their arms around their data architecture. When companies have highly regulated data elements such as HIPAA, PII, PCI-DSS and others, we also see “data haves” and “data have nots” as far as security in those companies. I would ask your business team and your data architects a few questions to see what might be missing from your data security plan.

The first one is to ask, “Have we actually had a company discussion on what our top two or three most critical assets are? And do we agree?” I think a very simple way to do that is you get in a staff meeting. Tell everybody no peeking. Pass out index cards and have everybody write down their list. Ask a facilitator to help you force rank each list until all agree on a company list.

The next question you should ask is, “What is our worst digital-disaster nightmare?” Name it and define it. Practice (dealing with) that nightmare. Learn what capabilities you have and don’t have. Discover where you need new partners to assist you. And then figure out what you can’t mitigate on your own through partners, through process, through technology—that’s what you want to go get cyber liability insurance to cover.

The other thing that I think companies overlook is that you can increase your security and reliability and also your resiliency if you pick the right cloud-services provider. If you are holding on to some legacy mail platforms and things like that, it may be time to reintroduce making a strategic decision around the cloud. That could save you money and it could, if you pick the right provider, create a whole new set of security protections and protocols you don’t have in-house.

More about Theresa: A pioneering technology leader

Theresa Payton is one of the nation’s leading experts in cybersecurity and IT strategy. She is currently CEO of Fortalice Solutions, an industry-leading security consulting company; and co-founder of Dark Cubed, a cybersecurity product company.

Theresa began her career in financial services, and after executive roles at Bank of America and Wachovia, she served as the first female chief information officer at the White House, overseeing IT operations for President George W. Bush and his staff.

Code42 Employees Give Back to the Community with Volunteer Hours

I came across a quote online that was written by the well-known actor, Will Smith. It read, “I want the world to be different because I was here. However lofty or crazy or delusional that may sound, I want people’s lives to be better because I was here.” Will may have played a few ‘out there’ characters during his acting career, but his mission to leave the world a better place and make an impact on people’s lives is far from delusional to the employees at Code42.

We believe so strongly and wholeheartedly in leaving the world a better place that we made it one of our core values. In pursuit of that value, Code42 offers every employee two paid volunteer time off (VTO) days a year.  Employees can give back to the community that they live and work in by sharing their time, talents and resources with a charitable cause or non-profit organization. The best part is that the employees are not directed to a specific organization. They choose the organization that matters most to them.

As a company, we believe that we have a corporate social responsibility to better the experience of those we share this world with. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once said, “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is: ‘What are you doing for others?’” Various departments at Code42 listened to this call and chose to volunteer as a team. The benefits of volunteering as a team are endless. By volunteering together, you not only help others, but also help yourself improve as a person. Giving back creates an opportunity for the team to help make change in a community and work towards something great together, all while building your own self-worth.

We are proud to say that in 2017 Code42 employees contributed more than 3,700 volunteer hours as part of our Code42 Cares initiative. The VTO program is an employee driven, grassroots committee that organizes and supports employees to volunteer. This committee does more than just provide volunteer opportunities. They go above and beyond their normal full-time job responsibilities to provide enriching life experiences that impact people personally and professionally.

In 2017, Code42 employees participated in a wide variety of volunteer activities, including working with the Build-A-Wheelchair Foundation, the American Red Cross and Habitat for Humanity. Employees have knit hats and scarves for the homeless, built bicycles for underprivileged children and packed 53,000 pounds of food at Second Harvest Heartland, an organization that collects and distributes food through various programs and services. One employee-led effort – the Extra Life charitable gaming marathon – raised over $10,000 for a local children’s hospital.

Code42’s commitment to giving back has not gone unnoticed by the organizations with which our employees have volunteered.

“The Sheridan Story’s mission is to fight child hunger through community and school partnerships, and we can’t do it without the community.” said Rob Williams, executive director at The Sheridan Story. “Volunteering is one of the most important ways to make an impact, and we are incredibly thankful for our friends at Code42. I appreciate the company’s commitment to providing paid time off for their employees to serve with their time.”

If you are looking for a career that challenges you, inspires you and truly emphasizes helping others, then check out the open positions at Code42 here. We invite you to help us leave the world a better place. #becode42