Gene Kim on DevOps, Part 2: The Cultural Impact of becoming a DevOps Org (Video)

Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and one of the most vocal thought leaders for DevOps, spent a day at Code42 headquarters in Minneapolis. During his visit, Gene talked about the optimal cultural conditions that must be in place for companies that embark on a DevOps journey and the advantages of bringing security to the table. This is the second installment in our three-part blog and video series, capturing our conversations with Gene.

As we’ve embarked on our own DevOps journey at Code42, we’ve experienced firsthand that the transformation must be embraced from a cultural perspective in order to make it happen. The core principals of DevOps require systematic thinking, coming together, gaining feedback and then at the same time, constant experimentation. For DevOps to work, it’s critical to have cultural norms that allow people to provide honest feedback without repercussions.

DevOps is not just for the engineering team. There’s something in DevOps that affects everybody from the systems architects to the operations teams to the very way in which QA is administered. In fact, the focus right now on privacy and security make the cultural perspective of DevOps more important than ever because it brings the security and engineering teams together in a very real way. That’s one of the things we at Code42 really appreciate about DevOps: that the cultural norms start to propagate around the organization, so you find groups collaborating across the company.

During my conversation with Gene, he reinforced the importance of team work. He said “Without a doubt, there has to be a sense of collegiality between information security and the engineering teams — that we are fellow team members working toward a common objective.  It’s so counter-intuitive how much more effective this is than the traditional high-ceremony and adversarial nature between infosec and everyone else!”

Listen to part two of my interview with Gene to hear what else he had to say about cultural norms, the absence of fear and empowering security.

“ Without a doubt, there has to be a sense of collegiality between information security and the engineering teams — that we are fellow team members working toward a common objective. ”

Check out the first part of our blog and video series with Gene’s for insights on how to become a DevOps org and watch for part three — why DevSecOps is more important than ever — coming soon.





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