Code42 Extra Life

Code42 Raises Over $13,000 for Children’s Miracle Network

This month, gamers of all kinds at Code42 participated in Extra Life, an annual charitable event during which participants pledge to take part in marathon gaming sessions, stream their efforts online, and solicit donations from friends and family. Most Extra Life teams play for 24 hours straight, but our team went above and beyond — this year we extended our Extra Life marathon to 42 consecutive hours to pay homage to our company name. It was a tough two days, but definitely worth it, as the money raised is for a good cause. “Staying up all night gaming with coworkers who are united by a great cause to help a local hospital make sick kids’ lives a bit better — now that’s a great combination,” said player Brian Sweet.

“ The excitement and enthusiasm that goes into participating in Extra Life is magical. I look forward to it all year long. I hope we can continue to raise the bar each year and make that impact bigger! ”

As of this writing, Team Code42 has raised $13,290 for Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare and other Children’s Miracle Network (CMN) hospitals — an increase of more than 30 percent over last year’s event. All donations from Extra Life go directly to the CMN hospitals, including our local CMN location, Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare. As a Minneapolis-based company, we are particularly excited to help a Twin Cities-based hospital, as giving back to our community is an important part of our company culture.

“Children’s Miracle Network hospitals do amazing work and save lives every day,” said participant Joseph Bozarth. “It means a lot to help them help even more children. It was also a great opportunity to get to know a lot of my coworkers better as we gamed together for a good cause.”

Taking advantage of our Volunteer Time Off program, which grants every Code42 employee two days per year to use for volunteer opportunities, our team of around 50 players spread out across several gaming waves to keep the experience fresh and exciting for the entire 42-hour event. A small crew of primarily Xbox One players kicked off the event on Thursday afternoon, another wave started Thursday evening and a third wave joined in Friday morning to take the team through to Saturday. Throughout the entire event, a separate group provided color commentary (and comedy) for the stream. If you were watching, you might have seen a frenzied match of Rocket League with two burly men in the corner talking about their beard grooming tips. 

Several games were streamed over the course of the event, including For Honor, Rocket League, Call of Duty: Black Ops 4, Dungeons & Dragons and many more. A few special events during the marathon grabbed company-wide attention, such as when members of the Code42 executive team competed against each other in Mario Kart (Senior Vice President of Research, Development and Operations Rob Juncker was the undisputed winner). Another highlight of the event was Rock Band 4, which was set up in the lunchroom for anyone in the company to play. You could hear the sounds of people singing Journey songs throughout the office.

“The excitement and enthusiasm that goes into participating in Extra Life is magical,” said Team Code42 member Tim Putnam. “I look forward to it all year long. I hope we can continue to raise the bar each year and make that impact bigger!”

We want to sincerely thank everyone who donated to our Extra Life event. If you meant to donate but didn’t get to it, there’s still time. To make a safe and easy online donation to a member of our team, click on the “Roster” tab and then on a participant’s name. Your donation is tax-deductible and will make miracles happen for families who desperately need them.

Thank you so much for supporting our team’s efforts!

How-Next-Gen-DLP-is-helping-Code42-customers-today

How Next-Gen DLP Is Helping Code42 Customers Today

Since we announced the Code42 Next-Gen Data Loss Protection (Next-Gen DLP) product last month, it has struck a chord with the prospects and industry analysts we’ve spoken to. It’s exciting to see, because we believe this is an important step beyond conventional data loss prevention technology.

With the introduction of our new product, Code42 is rewriting the paradigm for legacy data loss prevention — shifting the focus from prevention to protection. The Code42 Next-Gen DLP solution offers a simpler, quicker way to secure an organization’s endpoint and cloud data from loss, leak, misuse and theft. Unlike traditional DLP, this cloud-native solution safeguards every version of every file without complex policies and without blocking user productivity or collaboration.

“ Code42 is rewriting the paradigm for legacy data loss prevention — shifting the focus from prevention to protection. ”

The positive reception is no surprise to us. Code42 customers have been using the capabilities that make up Code42 Next-Gen DLP to secure their businesses from data threats for a long time. Here are some of their stories:

Full control of IP — even when employees leave

One of our customers is a global advertising and communications firm. Like many professional services businesses, they need to ensure that proprietary information stays inside the organization to maintain its competitive position and client trust. Backed by Code42’s solution, their organization has visibility into where files are moving and who has access to what information, protecting the company from stolen data — especially when employees leave the company. “It can be a huge hit to your reputation if you lose data specific to a client or project,” the infrastructure project manager said. “Code42 gives us an unalterable snapshot of every single record — which means we’re always protected.”

GDPR compliance with mobile workers

Marel is another customer that has put Code42 to work inside their organization. They are a food processing machinery company based in Iceland. Like many global companies, Marel must comply with the EU’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which strengthens personal data protection for business customers.

With Europe as one of its top markets, Marel needed a way to proactively protect and secure data stored on employee devices. “Our sales and service force use laptops heavily so they can work more efficiently while they’re traveling,” said Rob Janssen, manager of global infrastructure and QRC at Marel. “Likewise, managers also work from different locations. In the past their documents, which may contain sensitive data, were not always immediately synced back to the central storage solutions.”

Code42 continuously backs up every version of every file in real time, enabling Marel to comply with key GDPR data protection, recovery and notification requirements. Marel can easily meet GDPR rules requiring companies to report the extent of any personal data breach within 72 hours. The company can recover all files, including data that’s been deleted or maliciously encrypted. The ability to search through archives allows Janssen to determine what files were on a device at a given date and time, what users had access to those files, and what content, including personal information, was housed within those files.

“In the event of a data breach, Code42 helps us assess our exposure by giving us full visibility into every file on every laptop,” Janssen said. “We believe this is critical to complying with the GDPR. Of course, there is a strict process to be followed in these cases.”

A legal hold process with teeth

Another company we count as our customer is MacDonald-Miller. Located in the Pacific Northwest, they are a full-service, design-build mechanical contractor. MacDonald-Miller’s unique value proposition includes designing and blueprinting buildings, and then sending in a full team of plumbers, electricians and sheet metal workers to work on the build. With all that valuable design IP to protect, having an effective legal hold process is critical.

“Prior to Code42, our legal hold process was very vague,” said MacDonald-Miller Network Administrator Chad Tracy. “HR or IT had to find the user’s computer and manually try to search through documents, pictures and Excel files to see what may or may not have been on the user’s computer at the time of termination.”

Now, with Code42, MacDonald-Miller can use a portal to set up a legal hold for users and then monitor whether they’re copying documents on their personal drives.

“We had a pretty high-profile gentleman leaving the company,” said Eddie Anderson, a help desk support agent at MacDonald-Miller. “Through that portal, we were able to monitor his file history and found out 90 gigs of sales opportunities and other critical data had left to the network onto his external drive. Before Code42, there was no way of ever knowing that was happening.”

50,000 customers and counting

Code42 Next-Gen DLP is built from a combination of products that are part of the company’s award-winning data security portfolio, including Code42 Forensic File Search, File Exfiltration Detection, Legal Hold and Backup + Restore. Today, more than 50,000 customers are using capabilities that are part of the Code42 Next-Gen DLP solution.

If you’re a Code42 customer with a tale of success that you’d like to share, let us know. We look forward to including you in a future post!


Tips-From-the-Trenches--Enhancing-Phishing-Response-Investigations

Tips From the Trenches: Enhancing Phishing Response Investigations

In an earlier blog post, I explained how the Code42 security team is using security orchestration, automation and response (SOAR) tools to make our team more efficient. Today, I’d like to dive a little deeper and give you an example of how we’re combining a SOAR tool with the Code42 Forensic File Search API — part of the Code42 Next-Gen Data Loss Protection (DLP) product —  to streamline phishing response investigations.

A typical phishing response playbook — with a boost

Below is a screenshot of a relatively simple phishing response playbook that we created using Phantom (a SOAR tool) and the Code42 Forensic File Search API:

We based this playbook on a phishing template built into the Phantom solution. It includes many of the actions that would normally be applied as a response to a suspicious email — actions that investigate and geolocate IP addresses, and conduct reputation searches for IPs and domains. We added a couple of helper actions (“deproofpoint url” and “domain reputation”) to normalize URLs and assist with case management.

You may have noticed one unusual action. We added “hunt file” via the Code42 Forensic File Search API. If a suspicious email has an attachment, this action will search our entire environment by file hash for other copies of that attachment.

“ Combining the speed of Code42 Next-Gen DLP with the automation of SOAR tools can cut response times significantly. ”

What Code42 Next-Gen DLP can tell us

Applying Code42 Next-Gen DLP to our playbook shortens investigation time. The “hunt file” action allows us to quickly see if there are multiple copies of a malicious file in our environment. If that proves to be true, it is quick evidence that there may be a widespread email campaign against our users. On the other hand, the search may show that the file has a long internal history in file locations and on endpoints. This history would suggest that the file exists as part of normal operating procedure and that we may be dealing with a false alarm. Either way, together the Code42 Next-Gen DLP API and its investigation capability give us additional file context so our security team can make smarter, and more informed and confident decisions about what to do next.

Applying Code42 Next-Gen DLP to other threat investigations

This type of “hunt file” action does not need to be limited to investigating suspected phishing emails. In fact, it could be applied to any security event that involves a file — such as an anti-virus alert, an EDR alert or even IDS/IPS alerts that trigger on file events. Using Code42 Next-Gen DLP, security staff can determine in seconds where else that file exists in the environment and if any further action is necessary.

Combining the speed of Code42 Next-Gen DLP with the automation of SOAR tools can cut response times significantly. That’s something any security team can appreciate.

As always, happy threat hunting!

Baylor University Fast-Tracks Its Windows 10 Migration with Code42

Baylor University Fast-Tracks Its Windows 10 Migration

In order to quickly gain the benefits of Windows 10, Baylor University has been fast-tracking its migration across 8,000 PCs through a strategically scheduled process that effectively handles user settings and profiles. With that many devices on campus needing to be migrated to Windows 10, Baylor University’s IT team knew it had its work cut out for it. Baylor University recently joined Code42 for a webinar detailing their Windows 10 migration journey.

“We realized that there was a need to make the process a little bit smoother, a little bit faster,” said Mike Gonzales, assistant director of system support at Baylor University. “That’s when we started working on getting things scripted to give us the ability to migrate in a faster, more automated, consistent fashion.”

“ The quicker you can get them in and out of the office so they can get back to their day, the easier an experience it is for them. The goal is to leave them in a better position than when they first started. ”

Baylor University’s migration process

One of the first steps in Baylor’s process was to ensure that the IT team could encrypt and back up their devices on pace with the speed of the Windows 10 release cadence.

Once that was established, the team decided to roll out the migration with a testing phase. After they got comfortable with the process, they were then able to migrate larger numbers of devices. They started with the devices that would have the least impact and complexity — in their case desktop computers that didn’t have third-party encrypted software installed.

It was important to keep the migration process moving along because extended support for Windows 7 ends in January 2020. So they strategically scheduled a certain number of migrations per month to meet that deadline.

Creating a consistent, scalable process has been critical for Baylor University. The goal of their process was to ensure that all users had the same positive migration experience and that the IT team could successfully and quickly migrate a large number of devices.

A quick and easy experience for users

By integrating Microsoft’s User State Migration Tool (USMT) with Code42, Baylor’s IT team developed a script that automatically recreated a user’s profile and settings so that after the migration, the device was as familiar to users as it had been previously.

“When end users log in, they see their desktop background of their kids and that’s a really good user experience,” said Brad Hodges, senior analyst programmer at Baylor.

Using cloud-based technology such as InTune or Autopilot in combination with Code42 has helped with consistency and efficiency. The team can set up 32 machines to migrate concurrently in the installation area.

Because it’s moving from Windows 7 to Windows 10, Baylor University is using a wipe-and-reload process so as not to leave behind any legacy and incompatibility issues. The process has been efficient, consistent and reliable.

“It’s a huge change for our people to go from 7 to 10,” said Gonzales. “The quicker you can get them in and out of the office so they can get back to their day, the easier an experience it is for them. The goal is to leave them in a better position than when they first started.”

Up next for Baylor University

Now that they have refined their process and made it scalable, the IT team members have been making plans to extend their migration process to their Mac devices. They are also working on a project to create a self-service model for out-of-the-box devices. Based on the new model, users can unbox their device, log in and simply run a script to configure their new device with the same settings and profiles of their previous computer.

The Best of the Blog: October 2018

Catch up on the best stories from the Code42 blog that you might have missed in October. Here’s a roundup of highlights:

Code42 Next-Gen Data Loss Protection: What DLP Was Meant to Be
Legacy DLP systems often mean heavy policy management, lengthy deployments and blocks to employee productivity. It doesn’t have to be that way. Learn how simple, fast and effective next-gen DLP can be.

Tips From the Trenches: Architecting IAM for AWS with Okta
Amazon Web Services (AWS) can open up a world of opportunity for productivity improvement. Read about how Code42 implemented AWS while meeting stringent security standards.

MacDonald-Miller Boosts Mobile Workforce Productivity with Code42 (Video)
See how MacDonald-Miller saves time and safeguards valuable company IP by developing and implementing a multi-faceted data security strategy.

Tips From the Trenches: Searching Files in the Cloud
File movement investigations require a complete picture of the whole environment. Learn how Code42’s security team locates and monitors files across endpoints and cloud services like Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive.

Security-must-enable-people-Code42-Blog

Security Must Enable People, Not Restrain Them

Do you ever think about why we secure things? Sure, we secure our software and data so that attackers can’t steal what’s valuable to us — but we also secure our environments so that we have the safety to do what we need to do in our lives without interference. For example, law enforcement tries to keep the streets safe so that civilians are free to travel and conduct their daily business relatively free of worry.

Now consider how everyday police work keeps streets safe. It starts with the assumption that most drivers aren’t criminals. Officers don’t stop and interrogate every pedestrian or driver about why they are out in public. That type of policing — with so much effort spent questioning law-abiding citizens — would not only miss spotting a lot of actual criminal behavior, it would certainly damage the culture of such a society.

There’s a lot we can learn about how to approach data security from that analogy. Much of cybersecurity today focuses on trying to control the end user in the name of protecting the end user. There are painful restrictions placed on how employees can use technology, what files they are able to access and how they can access them. Fundamentally, we’ve built environments that are very restrictive for staff and other users, and sometimes outright stifling to their work and creativity.

This is why we need to think about security in terms of enablement, and not just restraint.

“ Security should be about enabling people to get their work done with a reasonable amount of protection — not forcing them to act in ways preordained by security technologies. ”

Prevention by itself doesn’t work

What does that mean in practicality? Consider legacy data loss prevention (DLP) software as an example. With traditional DLP, organizations are forced to create policies to restrict how their staff and other users can use available technology and how they can share information and collaborate. When users step slightly “out of line,” they are interrogated or blocked. This happens often and is mostly unnecessary.

This prevention bias is, unfortunately, a situation largely created by the nature of traditional DLP products. These tools ship with little more than a scripting language for administrators to craft policies — lots and lots of policies, related to data access and how data is permitted to flow through the environment. And if organizations don’t have a crystal-clear understanding of how everyone in the organization uses applications and data (which they very rarely do), big problems arise. People are prevented from doing what they need to do to succeed at their jobs. Security should be about enabling people to get their work done with a reasonable amount of protection — not forcing them to act in ways preordained by security technologies.

This is especially not acceptable today, with so much data being stored, accessed and shared in cloud environments. Cloud services pose serious challenges for traditional DLP solutions because of their focus on prevention. Since so many legacy DLP products are not cloud native, they lose visibility into what is happening on cloud systems. Too often, the result is that people are blocked from accessing the cloud services they need. Once again, users are treated like potential criminals — and culture and productivity both suffer.

This is also a poor approach to security, in general. As security professionals who have been around a while know, end-user behavior should never be overridden by technology, because users will find ways to work around overbearing policies. It’s just the law of governing dynamics and it will rear its head when the needs of security technologies are placed above the needs of users.

Where’s the value for users?

There is one last area I’d like to go over where traditional DLP falls short when it comes to providing user enablement, and it’s an important one. Traditional DLP doesn’t provide any tangible value back to staff and others when they are working in an environment protected with legacy DLP. All they typically get are warning boxes and delays in getting their work done.

In sum, traditional DLP — and security technology in general — doesn’t just prevent bad things from happening, it also too often prevents users from doing what they need to do. They feel restrained like criminals for simply trying to do their jobs. In actuality, a very small percentage of users will ever turn malicious. So why should we make everyone else feel like they are doing something wrong? We shouldn’t.

Code42 Next-Gen DLP

At Code42 we believe it’s essential to assume the best intentions of staff and other users. That’s why Code42 Next-Gen Data Loss Prevention focuses on identifying malicious activity, rather than assuming malicious intent from everyone. It’s why the product is built cloud-native: organizations aren’t blind when it comes to protecting popular cloud services, and users aren’t blocked from working the way they want to work. It also doesn’t require policies that need to be created and forever managed that pigeonhole users to work certain ways.

Finally, we believe in providing value to the end user. It’s why we provide backup and restore capability in Code42 Next-Gen DLP. This fundamentally gives users the freedom to make mistakes and recover from them, and it gives them the knowledge that that their data is also protected and safe.

Because it doesn’t block or interrogate users every step of the way, we believe Code42 Next-Gen DLP helps users to be more secure and productive, and enhances organization culture. It also provides the security team the opportunity to be an enabler for their end users, not an obstacle.

In this sense, Code42 Next-Gen DLP is a lot like good police work. It gives its users the freedom they need to move about the world without every motion being questioned for potential malicious intent. This is a very powerful shift in the workplace paradigm; users should be empowered to behave and collaborate as they want without fear or worry regarding the security technology in place.

Gene Kim on DevOps, Part 3: DevSecOps and Why It’s More Important Than Ever (Video)

We at Code42 were fortunate to have our good friend Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and the leading expert on DevOps, stop by our office for a conversation about DevOps and its implications for security. One of the best parts of the visit for me was talking with Gene about our DevSecOps experiences here at Code42 and how we have brought security into the DevOps model.

Here at Code42, we are on a mission to secure our customers’ ideas. That’s why our DevOps journey included bringing security into the DevOps model. I’m proud to say that we’ve been profoundly successful bringing those security risk controls into our process and making it part of our engineering process.

Security is often viewed—especially by engineering— as the department of “No.” Yet, in the DevOps model, you’re trying to embody self-service and autonomy, which can be difficult to square with accountability.

As our DevSecOps model has come together, our security team has been taking the time to establish the expectations for the engineering side of the house, and we’ve been able to implement those controls. One of the most gratifying outcomes for me is, instead of an after-the-fact security scan, we’re now proactively dealing with security as we design and build our software.

Now, engineering has the freedom to do what they need to do, because they’re able to talk more openly and collegially with the security team. A lot of the answers that were “No” before, when explained in the right context, become “Yes,” because the security team can enable the engineers to move forward.

During our interview, Gene echoed the advantages of bringing security to the DevOps table. “It’s been really gratifying to see organizations … call it not DevOps but DevSecOps,” said Gene. “Truly integrating all the information security objectives into everyone’s daily work.”

Hear what else Gene had to say about DevOps and its implications for security.

If you haven’t already, be sure to check out the previous two installments in our three-part blog and video series with Gene where he talks about what it takes to become a DevOps organization and the role of culture.

Gene Kim on DevOps, Part 1: How Do You Become a DevOps Organization?

Gene Kim on DevOps, Part 2: The Cultural Impact of becoming a DevOps Org

Gene Kim on DevOps, Part 2: The Cultural Impact of becoming a DevOps Org (Video)

Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and one of the most vocal thought leaders for DevOps, spent a day at Code42 headquarters in Minneapolis. During his visit, Gene talked about the optimal cultural conditions that must be in place for companies that embark on a DevOps journey and the advantages of bringing security to the table. This is the second installment in our three-part blog and video series, capturing our conversations with Gene.

As we’ve embarked on our own DevOps journey at Code42, we’ve experienced firsthand that the transformation must be embraced from a cultural perspective in order to make it happen. The core principals of DevOps require systematic thinking, coming together, gaining feedback and then at the same time, constant experimentation. For DevOps to work, it’s critical to have cultural norms that allow people to provide honest feedback without repercussions.

DevOps is not just for the engineering team. There’s something in DevOps that affects everybody from the systems architects to the operations teams to the very way in which QA is administered. In fact, the focus right now on privacy and security make the cultural perspective of DevOps more important than ever because it brings the security and engineering teams together in a very real way. That’s one of the things we at Code42 really appreciate about DevOps: that the cultural norms start to propagate around the organization, so you find groups collaborating across the company.

During my conversation with Gene, he reinforced the importance of team work. He said “Without a doubt, there has to be a sense of collegiality between information security and the engineering teams — that we are fellow team members working toward a common objective.  It’s so counter-intuitive how much more effective this is than the traditional high-ceremony and adversarial nature between infosec and everyone else!”

Listen to part two of my interview with Gene to hear what else he had to say about cultural norms, the absence of fear and empowering security.

“ Without a doubt, there has to be a sense of collegiality between information security and the engineering teams — that we are fellow team members working toward a common objective. ”

Check out the first part of our blog and video series with Gene for insights on how to become a DevOps org and part three — why DevSecOps is more important than ever.





Gene Kim on DevOps, Part 1: How Do You Become a DevOps Organization? (Video)

Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project, stopped by our offices. Gene, who is regarded in the industry as one of —if not the — most vocal enthusiasts of DevOps, is a friend of Code42 and a personal mentor of mine. I was thrilled to sit down and interview him. As a result of our visit, we created a three-part blog and video series, where we explore his views on DevOps — particularly security’s growing role. Our first installment opens with his thoughts on what goes into becoming a DevOps company.

The books Gene has written and his perspective on DevOps have changed the way we at Code42 think about our process. After going through our own DevOps journey, we’ve been optimizing our teams to improve our speed of delivery, ensuring we get our customers the features they need faster.

We are not the only ones to find ourselves on this transformational path. Many of our customers are on DevOps journeys of their own — or thinking about starting one — so we wanted to share our experiences and Gene’s best practices on becoming a DevOps organization.

When I was talking to Gene, I asked him about what it means to be a DevOps company, particularly in this day and age when security is such a top concern for businesses and consumers. We hope this video will help companies understand some of the implications and real advantages of adopting a DevOps model.

“ One of the biggest surprises coming off The Phoenix Project is just to see how much DevOps can dramatically improve the lives of not only developers, but also QA, operations and security. ”

During our conversation, Gene said, One of the biggest surprises coming off The Phoenix Project is just to see how much DevOps can dramatically improve the lives of not only developers, but also QA, operations and security.”

Be sure to check out the next two installments in our three-part blog and video series with Gene, where he talks about the role of culture in becoming a DevOps org and why DevOpsSec is more important than ever.

Gene Kim on DevOps, Part 2: The Cultural Impact of becoming a DevOps Org

Gene Kim on DevOps, Part 3: DevSecOps and Why It’s More Important Than Ever (Video)

Security Panel: Filling Gaps in Your Security Stack (Video)

Keeping up with the constantly evolving cyber threatscape and plugging new security gaps is never-ending. We recently gathered several members of the Code42 security team for a panel discussion about how they manage threats and mitigate risks in today’s security environment. A recording of their conversation is now available on demand.

Below are a few highlights and sneak peeks from their conversation. You can check out the full panel discussion here.

Vendor risk management in the SaaS era

Maintaining visibility across a SaaS environment can be very challenging. One action our security team has taken to help address the situation is to put more focus on vendor risk management. Watch the short clip below to learn how they have defined a set of security controls for our vendor partners — and how the team holds vendors accountable to these standards.

Managing insider threats

Not all insider threats are malicious. People sometimes make mistakes and unexpected disruptions can put data at risk. In the next video clip, our security team talks about strategies to consider when implementing a comprehensive insider threat security plan that protects against both malicious and unintended threats.

Mitigating the risk of shadow IT with an application inventory

Gartner now predicts that by 2020, one-third of successful enterprise attacks will aim at unauthorized shadow IT applications. At Code42, we know that shadow IT is a big security risk. We also know it’s a risk that we’re not going to fully eliminate. Instead, our security team is focused on increasing our visibility to what applications — authorized or not — exist in our environment. In this next video clip, our panel shares how they search for instances of potentially compromised applications, so they can take quick and effective action.

How Code42 Forensic File Search fits in the security tech stack

With the wide range of security tools that already exist, where does Code42 Forensic File Search fit in a security stack? In the next video clip, our security team talks about how they use Code42 Forensic File Search in combination with other security tools and on its own to address unique use cases. The panel also talks about innovative ways that organizations can use Code42 Forensic File Search to fill existing security gaps, instantly expanding visibility and getting answers to questions like “Where is this file in our environment?”

This is just a sample of the insider knowledge shared during our panel discussion. Don’t miss your chance to hear the full conversation, on demand, right here: Code42 Security Panel: Choosing Tools to Fill Gaps in Your Security Stack