Securing Your Software Supply Chain Code42 Blog

Securing Your Software Supply Chain

Software supply chain attacks have hit the news in a big way. In March, hardware maker ASUSTeK Computer, or ASUS, found its auto-update process hijacked to deliver malware and more than a million users may have downloaded a backdoored version of the company’s update software. 

Concerns about these types of attacks are growing. In recent years, we’ve witnessed attackers increasingly leveraging software supply chain attacks to do things, such as corrupt PC utility software and collaborative development tools. 

Supply chain attacks are different from other cyberattacks in a number of ways. In addition to being sophisticated, successful attacks have the ability to impact thousands to millions of users in ways few cyberattacks can. Then there’s the rising complexity of software. Software vendors today are making software self-updating and even self-healing. Because of all this, and the increasing amount of open source and third-party software in use, I expect the supply chain attack vector to become more common.

With this in mind, it’s important to understand the steps your software makers and providers are taking to protect the software and systems they provide you. 

“ One must take the best of precautions, such as conducting due diligence on hardware and software providers and ensuring that they do what they can to keep their systems and customers secure. ”

For instance, to help ensure the integrity of our software, we take a number of precautions here at Code42. We protect our systems with defense-in-depth, and we monitor the integrity of our files. We also encrypt our software certificates, and we make sure they are safe and well protected. We maintain strong file validation, to mitigate the risk that an attacker might inject something nasty and try to deploy software while posing as us to our customers.

Still, these types of attacks are very humbling for security professionals. They highlight the stark reality that no matter how many precautions one takes, everyone is still part of a chain of technology and reliant on third-parties. And if anyone in that chain of technology and services gets compromised, you are also now at significant risk of compromise. One must take the best of precautions, such as conducting due diligence on hardware and software providers and ensuring that they do what they can to keep their systems and customers secure.

While there’s certainly no guarantee of success, there are things one can do to approach the security of your software supply-chain.

First, I’d like to say, broadly, is that you should generally trust your software vendors. When a software provider publishes updates, there is a good reason. Good software development, especially one that includes software security, is a process — a process that certainly doesn’t end when software ships. In fact, the time to be concerned about trusting software vendors is if they’ve never reported a vulnerability. If not, there’s a good chance that they are not being transparent, or they are not looking closely enough. I don’t know which is worse. 

It’s also important to make sure that your software providers engage in secure software best practices. When issuing updates, are they signed? Are application bundles and libraries signed? Do they have a functioning vulnerability reporting process and publicly posted policy related to security patches? Make certain these things are in place.

Finally, don’t think it’s smart to block or skip updates. You could actually “denial-of-service” yourself by blocking updates because your software could stop properly functioning without new code. Some organizations think blocking updates helps improve their systems stability. It doesn’t. If your change controls are too rigid, they need to be updated so that software updates can be tested and then rolled out efficiently. Additionally, software compliance as well as government and industry regulations likely mandate that systems be kept up to date. 

When it comes to defending an organization against software supply chain attacks, it’s crucial that not only security best practices be closely followed, but one also needs to hold the seemingly contradictive assumption that nearly two-thirds of IT security professionals believe a successful cyberattack is imminent in 2019. This is why, in addition to the usual good user authentication practices, data backups, system and network segmentation, and anti-malware, it’s crucial to monitor for file integrity and mysterious traffic patterns. That means making certain that systems and data are persistently monitored for potentially malicious activity, such as unauthorized data exfiltration and other shenanigans. 

That’s certainly not a panacea. But the reality is there isn’t one. Still, every organization needs to be proactive and take the steps necessary to identify any anomalies underway in their environment. And they need to make sure their software providers are, for their own part, taking an aggressive stance themselves when it comes to software security and protecting themselves, and therefore their customers, from attack.

While security-savvy organizations have long thought about the nature of the security of the software they install, it’s time they also think more about the software update process from each of their vendors, and continue to do so for as long as it’s being used.